The Best of Enemies - Wikipedia

C. P. Ellis—a Grand Cyclops of the KKK—and Ann Atwater—an African American civil rights proponent—clash during the desegregation of Durham, North Carolina, schools in 1971. Based on the bestselling book by Osha Gray Davidson, this true story exposes the deep prejudices of two community leaders who by opposing one another, gain first understanding and then an utterly improbable friendship.  

Best of Enemies received its world premiere at Barrington Stage Company in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on July 12, 2012. It was directed by Julianne Boyd, Artistic Director of Barrington Stage Company. The show was subsequently presented at George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, New Jersey, opening on November 30, 2012.

“In the annals of strange political bedfellows, few alliances can have been stranger than that of Ann Atwater and C. P. Ellis…Their unlikely partnership, and even more unlikely friendship that flowed from it, is the subject of Mark St Germain’s fine new play, BEST OF ENEMIES.”

Legendary nationally televised debates in 1968 between two great public intellectuals, Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley, defined a new era of public discourse in the media, the moment TV’s political ambition shifted from narrative to spectacle.

C. P. Ellis—a Grand Cyclops of the KKK—and Ann Atwater—an African American civil rights proponent—clash during the desegregation of Durham, North Carolina, schools in 1971. Based on the bestselling book by Osha Gray Davidson, this true story exposes the deep prejudices of two community leaders who by opposing one another, gain first understanding and then an utterly improbable friendship.  

Best of Enemies received its world premiere at Barrington Stage Company in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on July 12, 2012. It was directed by Julianne Boyd, Artistic Director of Barrington Stage Company. The show was subsequently presented at George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, New Jersey, opening on November 30, 2012.

“In the annals of strange political bedfellows, few alliances can have been stranger than that of Ann Atwater and C. P. Ellis…Their unlikely partnership, and even more unlikely friendship that flowed from it, is the subject of Mark St Germain’s fine new play, BEST OF ENEMIES.”

C. P. Ellis—a Grand Cyclops of the KKK—and Ann Atwater—an African American civil rights proponent—clash during the desegregation of Durham, North Carolina, schools in 1971. Based on the bestselling book by Osha Gray Davidson, this true story exposes the deep prejudices of two community leaders who by opposing one another, gain first understanding and then an utterly improbable friendship.  

Best of Enemies received its world premiere at Barrington Stage Company in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on July 12, 2012. It was directed by Julianne Boyd, Artistic Director of Barrington Stage Company. The show was subsequently presented at George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, New Jersey, opening on November 30, 2012.

“In the annals of strange political bedfellows, few alliances can have been stranger than that of Ann Atwater and C. P. Ellis…Their unlikely partnership, and even more unlikely friendship that flowed from it, is the subject of Mark St Germain’s fine new play, BEST OF ENEMIES.”

Legendary nationally televised debates in 1968 between two great public intellectuals, Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley, defined a new era of public discourse in the media, the moment TV’s political ambition shifted from narrative to spectacle.

The intense 1968 TV debates between Gore Vidal and William F Buckley are preserved forever in a film that shows up the moronic TV screamers of today

O utside in Grant Park, the Chicago Police Department’s “Blue Riot” at the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention: an orgy of nightsticks and cracked student skulls, blood on the streets, and the effective demise of the Democratic party for a generation. Inside the sweltering convention hall, two nationally esteemed American public intellectuals – one right, one left – going at it hammer and tongs on national TV at prime time, trading homophobic insults (“Now listen, you queer...”) for accusations of fascism (“Stop calling me a crypto-Nazi...”) and threats of violence (“Or I’ll sock you in your goddamn face!”). As het-up moderator Howard J Smith said: “Now gentlemen, let’s not call names!”

Those words were snarled during live TV news coverage by William F Buckley, founder of postwar US conservatism, editor of the National Review and failed political candidate for mayor of New York in 1965, at novelist and essayist Gore Vidal, the John the Baptist of the US gay liberation movement, author of the most scandalous bestseller of 1968, Myra Breckinridge (which had nauseated Buckley), and failed political candidate for the House of Representatives, 1960.

C. P. Ellis—a Grand Cyclops of the KKK—and Ann Atwater—an African American civil rights proponent—clash during the desegregation of Durham, North Carolina, schools in 1971. Based on the bestselling book by Osha Gray Davidson, this true story exposes the deep prejudices of two community leaders who by opposing one another, gain first understanding and then an utterly improbable friendship.  

Best of Enemies received its world premiere at Barrington Stage Company in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on July 12, 2012. It was directed by Julianne Boyd, Artistic Director of Barrington Stage Company. The show was subsequently presented at George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, New Jersey, opening on November 30, 2012.

“In the annals of strange political bedfellows, few alliances can have been stranger than that of Ann Atwater and C. P. Ellis…Their unlikely partnership, and even more unlikely friendship that flowed from it, is the subject of Mark St Germain’s fine new play, BEST OF ENEMIES.”

Legendary nationally televised debates in 1968 between two great public intellectuals, Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley, defined a new era of public discourse in the media, the moment TV’s political ambition shifted from narrative to spectacle.

The intense 1968 TV debates between Gore Vidal and William F Buckley are preserved forever in a film that shows up the moronic TV screamers of today

O utside in Grant Park, the Chicago Police Department’s “Blue Riot” at the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention: an orgy of nightsticks and cracked student skulls, blood on the streets, and the effective demise of the Democratic party for a generation. Inside the sweltering convention hall, two nationally esteemed American public intellectuals – one right, one left – going at it hammer and tongs on national TV at prime time, trading homophobic insults (“Now listen, you queer...”) for accusations of fascism (“Stop calling me a crypto-Nazi...”) and threats of violence (“Or I’ll sock you in your goddamn face!”). As het-up moderator Howard J Smith said: “Now gentlemen, let’s not call names!”

Those words were snarled during live TV news coverage by William F Buckley, founder of postwar US conservatism, editor of the National Review and failed political candidate for mayor of New York in 1965, at novelist and essayist Gore Vidal, the John the Baptist of the US gay liberation movement, author of the most scandalous bestseller of 1968, Myra Breckinridge (which had nauseated Buckley), and failed political candidate for the House of Representatives, 1960.

The Best of Enemies ( I due nemici ) is a 1961 Italian film directed by Guy Hamilton and Alessandro Blasetti set during the World War II East African Campaign but filmed in Israel. It stars David Niven , Alberto Sordi and Michael Wilding . It was nominated for three Golden Globe awards in 1963. [2] [ better source needed ]

Set in Italian East Africa (Ethiopia) during WW2, the wartime comedy plays on the clash between Richardson (Niven), a typical product of the British officer corps (quiet, methodic, but often stubborn and unprepared to deal with the unexpected) and the flamboyant Blasi, who tries desperately to appear ruthless and efficient.

The Best of Enemies was distributed theatrically in Italy by De Laurentiis on 26 October 1961. [1] It grossed a total of 1,088,040,000 lire domestically. [1] It was released in the United States on 6 August 1962. [1]

 
 
 
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