Two Cheers for Democracy by E.M. Forster - Goodreads

Edward Morgan Forster, the son of Edward Forster, an architect, and Marianne Thornton, was born in London on 1st January 1879. After an education at Tonbridge School and King's College , Cambridge, he spent a year travelling in Europe.

On his return to England in 1903, Forster taught Latin at the Working Men's College in London . He also joined with his friend, G. M. Trevelyan , to establish the Independent Review, a journal that supported the more progressive wing of the Liberal Party . Over the next few years the journal supported social reform and criticised the imperialistic foreign policies of the Conservative government.

Forster also became a member of the Bloomsbury Group that met and discussed literary and artistic issues. The group Virginia Woolf , Vanessa Bell , Clive Bell , John Maynard Keynes , Leonard Woolf , Lytton Strachey , David Garnett , Roger Fry and Duncan Grant .

Edward Morgan Forster, the son of Edward Forster, an architect, and Marianne Thornton, was born in London on 1st January 1879. After an education at Tonbridge School and King's College , Cambridge, he spent a year travelling in Europe.

On his return to England in 1903, Forster taught Latin at the Working Men's College in London . He also joined with his friend, G. M. Trevelyan , to establish the Independent Review, a journal that supported the more progressive wing of the Liberal Party . Over the next few years the journal supported social reform and criticised the imperialistic foreign policies of the Conservative government.

Forster also became a member of the Bloomsbury Group that met and discussed literary and artistic issues. The group Virginia Woolf , Vanessa Bell , Clive Bell , John Maynard Keynes , Leonard Woolf , Lytton Strachey , David Garnett , Roger Fry and Duncan Grant .

" What I Believe " is the title of two essays espousing humanism , one by Bertrand Russell (1925) and one by E. M. Forster (1938).

E. M. Forster says that he does not believe in creeds; but there are so many around that one has to formulate a creed of one’s own in self-defence. Three values are important to Forster: tolerance, good temper and sympathy.

Forster argues that one should invest in personal relationships: “one must be fond of people and trust them if one is not to make a mess of life”. In order to do so, one must be reliable in one’s relationships. Reliability, in turn, is impossible without natural warmth. Forster contrasts personal relationships with causes, which he hates. In an often quoted sentence he argues: “If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend I hope I should have the guts to betray my country”. He goes on to explain:

W hen Nigeria returned to a democratic system of government 15 years ago today , the country's citizens heaved a sigh of relief. After three decades of virtually uninterrupted military rule, Nigerians were delighted to see their army return to the barracks.

The fact that the winner of the first presidential elections in 1999, Olusegun Obasanjo, happened to be a former military dictator himself, was considered a price worth paying for the army to leave quietly.

Boko Haram, the Islamist terrorist group, is bombing, kidnapping and murdering people at will while Nigeria's civilian government looks on helplessly. The country's politicians are among the most corrupt in the world. The power supply is erratic, clean water remains inaccessible to most and the public healthcare system belongs to the stone age. Roughly a quarter of the population is unemployed, according to official statistics that are widely regarded as underestimates.

Edward Morgan Forster, the son of Edward Forster, an architect, and Marianne Thornton, was born in London on 1st January 1879. After an education at Tonbridge School and King's College , Cambridge, he spent a year travelling in Europe.

On his return to England in 1903, Forster taught Latin at the Working Men's College in London . He also joined with his friend, G. M. Trevelyan , to establish the Independent Review, a journal that supported the more progressive wing of the Liberal Party . Over the next few years the journal supported social reform and criticised the imperialistic foreign policies of the Conservative government.

Forster also became a member of the Bloomsbury Group that met and discussed literary and artistic issues. The group Virginia Woolf , Vanessa Bell , Clive Bell , John Maynard Keynes , Leonard Woolf , Lytton Strachey , David Garnett , Roger Fry and Duncan Grant .

" What I Believe " is the title of two essays espousing humanism , one by Bertrand Russell (1925) and one by E. M. Forster (1938).

E. M. Forster says that he does not believe in creeds; but there are so many around that one has to formulate a creed of one’s own in self-defence. Three values are important to Forster: tolerance, good temper and sympathy.

Forster argues that one should invest in personal relationships: “one must be fond of people and trust them if one is not to make a mess of life”. In order to do so, one must be reliable in one’s relationships. Reliability, in turn, is impossible without natural warmth. Forster contrasts personal relationships with causes, which he hates. In an often quoted sentence he argues: “If I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend I hope I should have the guts to betray my country”. He goes on to explain:

 
 
 
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