Hemingway on War and Its Aftermath | National Archives

The Ernest Hemingway Foundation was established in 1965 by Mary Hemingway, Ernest’s widow, “for the purposes of awakening, sustaining an interest in, promoting, fostering, stimulating, supporting, improving and developing literature and all forms of literary composition and expression.”

From: The Hemingway Review
Volume 22, Number 1, Fall 2002
pp. 34-55 | 10.1353/hem.2002.0004

Hemingway's war experiences contributed enormously and essentially to his sense of gender (however confused) such that studies of either war or gender in his life and work ought to consider the other. Cultural-historic constructions of the war-gender relationship very much informed Hemingway's own sensibilities and thus his fiction. Even in his work not directly about war, we should be able to read the war's presence through textual performances of gender. Texts the essay considers include "Big Two-Hearted River," A Farewell to Arms , "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," "Cross-Country Snow," and "An Alpine Idyll."

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Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 - July 2, 1961) was an American writer . He is generally thought to be a member of the Lost Generation . Some people say that, of the many characters he created in his books, the author himself was his best creation.

Ernest Hemingway was born in 1899. He grew up in Oak Park , Illinois , near the midwestern city of Chicago . He was the second child in a family of six. His father was a doctor . His mother was a painter and a pianist .

Each summer , the family travelled to their holiday home in northern Michigan . Ernest's father taught him how to catch fish , hunt, set up a camp , and cook over a fire .

The Ernest Hemingway Foundation was established in 1965 by Mary Hemingway, Ernest’s widow, “for the purposes of awakening, sustaining an interest in, promoting, fostering, stimulating, supporting, improving and developing literature and all forms of literary composition and expression.”

The Ernest Hemingway Foundation was established in 1965 by Mary Hemingway, Ernest’s widow, “for the purposes of awakening, sustaining an interest in, promoting, fostering, stimulating, supporting, improving and developing literature and all forms of literary composition and expression.”

From: The Hemingway Review
Volume 22, Number 1, Fall 2002
pp. 34-55 | 10.1353/hem.2002.0004

Hemingway's war experiences contributed enormously and essentially to his sense of gender (however confused) such that studies of either war or gender in his life and work ought to consider the other. Cultural-historic constructions of the war-gender relationship very much informed Hemingway's own sensibilities and thus his fiction. Even in his work not directly about war, we should be able to read the war's presence through textual performances of gender. Texts the essay considers include "Big Two-Hearted River," A Farewell to Arms , "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," "Cross-Country Snow," and "An Alpine Idyll."

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

 
 
 
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