What Christianity in China Is Really Like

Christianity in China has a history going back to the 7th century during the Tang dynasty . Today, it comprises Catholics , Protestants , and a small number of Orthodox Christians . Although its lineage in China is not as ancient as the institutional religions of Taoism , Mahayana Buddhism and Confucianism , [note 1] Christianity has existed in China since at least the seventh century and has gained influence over the past 200 years. [3] [4]

In recent years, the number of Chinese Christians has increased significantly, particularly since the easing of restrictions on religious activity during economic reforms in the late 1970s; Christians were 4 million before 1949 (3 million Catholics and 1 million Protestants), and are in the tens of millions today. [5] Various statistical analyses have found that between 2% and 4% of the Chinese identify as Christian.

There are various terms used for God in the Chinese language, the most prevalent being Shangdi (上帝, literally, "Highest Emperor"), used commonly by Protestants and also by non-Christians, and Tianzhu (天主, literally, "Lord of Heaven"), which is most commonly favoured by Catholics. Shen (神), also widely used by Chinese Protestants, defines the gods or generative powers of nature in Chinese traditional religions . Historically, Christians have also adopted a variety of terms from the Chinese classics as referents to God, for example Ruler (主宰) and Creator (造物主).

The most widely accepted record of the earliest existence of Christianity in China is a stone stele dated 781 A.D. that detailed Christian missionaries’ activities ...

28.04.2016  · Bulldozer death of pastor’s wife draws attention, but president’s long-awaited speech on religion will impact Chinese Christians much more.

15.06.2017  · Colin Clark with five pointers that will help you better understand the landscape of the church in China .

Christianity in China has a history going back to the 7th century during the Tang dynasty . Today, it comprises Catholics , Protestants , and a small number of Orthodox Christians . Although its lineage in China is not as ancient as the institutional religions of Taoism , Mahayana Buddhism and Confucianism , [note 1] Christianity has existed in China since at least the seventh century and has gained influence over the past 200 years. [3] [4]

In recent years, the number of Chinese Christians has increased significantly, particularly since the easing of restrictions on religious activity during economic reforms in the late 1970s; Christians were 4 million before 1949 (3 million Catholics and 1 million Protestants), and are in the tens of millions today. [5] Various statistical analyses have found that between 2% and 4% of the Chinese identify as Christian.

There are various terms used for God in the Chinese language, the most prevalent being Shangdi (上帝, literally, "Highest Emperor"), used commonly by Protestants and also by non-Christians, and Tianzhu (天主, literally, "Lord of Heaven"), which is most commonly favoured by Catholics. Shen (神), also widely used by Chinese Protestants, defines the gods or generative powers of nature in Chinese traditional religions . Historically, Christians have also adopted a variety of terms from the Chinese classics as referents to God, for example Ruler (主宰) and Creator (造物主).

The most widely accepted record of the earliest existence of Christianity in China is a stone stele dated 781 A.D. that detailed Christian missionaries’ activities ...

28.04.2016  · Bulldozer death of pastor’s wife draws attention, but president’s long-awaited speech on religion will impact Chinese Christians much more.

15.06.2017  · Colin Clark with five pointers that will help you better understand the landscape of the church in China .

China was once the most secular country in the world, but in the last three and a half decades, while undergoing rapid modernization, many religions have been thriving. From 1966 to 1979, driven by an atheistic ideology, the Communist Party-State closed down all churches, temples, and mosques. The only other country that eradicated all religion was Albania. (In fact, the Albanian Communist leadership was inspired by the Chinese Communists and rushed to implement its eradication policy.) Even the Soviet Union kept at least a few hundred churches open for religious worship, including during the harshest periods of anti-religious campaigns. Not so China.

Along with the rapid economic growth since the late 1970s, China has been undergoing rapid industrialization, urbanization, and globalization. Meanwhile, various religions have flourished—not only among older people, but also among post-1949 generations. Moreover, many religious individuals and groups are outside of the “patriotic” associations. This was surprising to the atheist Communists and puzzling to the modernist scholars who have subscribed to secularization theories that predict the inevitable decline of religion.

With respect to future developments, we may imagine three different scenarios. First, China will continue its current mode of steady economic growth and political stability without major change to its religious policy. Second, while economic growth and political stability will continue, the restrictions on Christianity will increase. Third, there will be social and political turmoil, such as revolutions and wars, which would render the religious policy irrelevant. All three scenarios are plausible; they have all more or less happened in the recent past.

Christianity in China has a history going back to the 7th century during the Tang dynasty . Today, it comprises Catholics , Protestants , and a small number of Orthodox Christians . Although its lineage in China is not as ancient as the institutional religions of Taoism , Mahayana Buddhism and Confucianism , [note 1] Christianity has existed in China since at least the seventh century and has gained influence over the past 200 years. [3] [4]

In recent years, the number of Chinese Christians has increased significantly, particularly since the easing of restrictions on religious activity during economic reforms in the late 1970s; Christians were 4 million before 1949 (3 million Catholics and 1 million Protestants), and are in the tens of millions today. [5] Various statistical analyses have found that between 2% and 4% of the Chinese identify as Christian.

There are various terms used for God in the Chinese language, the most prevalent being Shangdi (上帝, literally, "Highest Emperor"), used commonly by Protestants and also by non-Christians, and Tianzhu (天主, literally, "Lord of Heaven"), which is most commonly favoured by Catholics. Shen (神), also widely used by Chinese Protestants, defines the gods or generative powers of nature in Chinese traditional religions . Historically, Christians have also adopted a variety of terms from the Chinese classics as referents to God, for example Ruler (主宰) and Creator (造物主).

The most widely accepted record of the earliest existence of Christianity in China is a stone stele dated 781 A.D. that detailed Christian missionaries’ activities ...

28.04.2016  · Bulldozer death of pastor’s wife draws attention, but president’s long-awaited speech on religion will impact Chinese Christians much more.

15.06.2017  · Colin Clark with five pointers that will help you better understand the landscape of the church in China .

China was once the most secular country in the world, but in the last three and a half decades, while undergoing rapid modernization, many religions have been thriving. From 1966 to 1979, driven by an atheistic ideology, the Communist Party-State closed down all churches, temples, and mosques. The only other country that eradicated all religion was Albania. (In fact, the Albanian Communist leadership was inspired by the Chinese Communists and rushed to implement its eradication policy.) Even the Soviet Union kept at least a few hundred churches open for religious worship, including during the harshest periods of anti-religious campaigns. Not so China.

Along with the rapid economic growth since the late 1970s, China has been undergoing rapid industrialization, urbanization, and globalization. Meanwhile, various religions have flourished—not only among older people, but also among post-1949 generations. Moreover, many religious individuals and groups are outside of the “patriotic” associations. This was surprising to the atheist Communists and puzzling to the modernist scholars who have subscribed to secularization theories that predict the inevitable decline of religion.

With respect to future developments, we may imagine three different scenarios. First, China will continue its current mode of steady economic growth and political stability without major change to its religious policy. Second, while economic growth and political stability will continue, the restrictions on Christianity will increase. Third, there will be social and political turmoil, such as revolutions and wars, which would render the religious policy irrelevant. All three scenarios are plausible; they have all more or less happened in the recent past.

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Christians living in the Americas make up 37% of Christians worldwide. 8 The three countries in the Americas with the largest Christian populations also have the three largest Christian populations in the world: the United States (247 million Christians), Brazil (176 million) and Mexico (108 million). The 10 countries in the Americas with the largest number of Christians collectively are home to a third (33%) of all the world’s Christians.

Nearly two-thirds of Christians in the Americas (65%) are Catholic. Protestants make up a third of all Christians (33%) in the region. About 2% of the region’s Christians fall into the other Christian category, and less than 1% are Orthodox Christians.

Though Christian support organization Open Doors ranked China just outside the top 20 of the world’s worst persecutors in 2011, its estimated 67 million Christians make up the world’s largest persecuted church (and some place the number of Christians even higher). But in recent years, publication of Bibles and other Christian books has dramatically increased, thanks in part to government approval. Still, as the 2011 drama surrounding Beijing’s Shouwang house church illustrates, the government continues to constrict freedom of worship in many places.

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Christianity in China has a history going back to the 7th century during the Tang dynasty . Today, it comprises Catholics , Protestants , and a small number of Orthodox Christians . Although its lineage in China is not as ancient as the institutional religions of Taoism , Mahayana Buddhism and Confucianism , [note 1] Christianity has existed in China since at least the seventh century and has gained influence over the past 200 years. [3] [4]

In recent years, the number of Chinese Christians has increased significantly, particularly since the easing of restrictions on religious activity during economic reforms in the late 1970s; Christians were 4 million before 1949 (3 million Catholics and 1 million Protestants), and are in the tens of millions today. [5] Various statistical analyses have found that between 2% and 4% of the Chinese identify as Christian.

There are various terms used for God in the Chinese language, the most prevalent being Shangdi (上帝, literally, "Highest Emperor"), used commonly by Protestants and also by non-Christians, and Tianzhu (天主, literally, "Lord of Heaven"), which is most commonly favoured by Catholics. Shen (神), also widely used by Chinese Protestants, defines the gods or generative powers of nature in Chinese traditional religions . Historically, Christians have also adopted a variety of terms from the Chinese classics as referents to God, for example Ruler (主宰) and Creator (造物主).

The most widely accepted record of the earliest existence of Christianity in China is a stone stele dated 781 A.D. that detailed Christian missionaries’ activities ...

28.04.2016  · Bulldozer death of pastor’s wife draws attention, but president’s long-awaited speech on religion will impact Chinese Christians much more.

15.06.2017  · Colin Clark with five pointers that will help you better understand the landscape of the church in China .

China was once the most secular country in the world, but in the last three and a half decades, while undergoing rapid modernization, many religions have been thriving. From 1966 to 1979, driven by an atheistic ideology, the Communist Party-State closed down all churches, temples, and mosques. The only other country that eradicated all religion was Albania. (In fact, the Albanian Communist leadership was inspired by the Chinese Communists and rushed to implement its eradication policy.) Even the Soviet Union kept at least a few hundred churches open for religious worship, including during the harshest periods of anti-religious campaigns. Not so China.

Along with the rapid economic growth since the late 1970s, China has been undergoing rapid industrialization, urbanization, and globalization. Meanwhile, various religions have flourished—not only among older people, but also among post-1949 generations. Moreover, many religious individuals and groups are outside of the “patriotic” associations. This was surprising to the atheist Communists and puzzling to the modernist scholars who have subscribed to secularization theories that predict the inevitable decline of religion.

With respect to future developments, we may imagine three different scenarios. First, China will continue its current mode of steady economic growth and political stability without major change to its religious policy. Second, while economic growth and political stability will continue, the restrictions on Christianity will increase. Third, there will be social and political turmoil, such as revolutions and wars, which would render the religious policy irrelevant. All three scenarios are plausible; they have all more or less happened in the recent past.

About Follow My Account Log in View Account Log out Donate

Christians living in the Americas make up 37% of Christians worldwide. 8 The three countries in the Americas with the largest Christian populations also have the three largest Christian populations in the world: the United States (247 million Christians), Brazil (176 million) and Mexico (108 million). The 10 countries in the Americas with the largest number of Christians collectively are home to a third (33%) of all the world’s Christians.

Nearly two-thirds of Christians in the Americas (65%) are Catholic. Protestants make up a third of all Christians (33%) in the region. About 2% of the region’s Christians fall into the other Christian category, and less than 1% are Orthodox Christians.

Christianity in China has a history going back to the 7th century during the Tang dynasty . Today, it comprises Catholics , Protestants , and a small number of Orthodox Christians . Although its lineage in China is not as ancient as the institutional religions of Taoism , Mahayana Buddhism and Confucianism , [note 1] Christianity has existed in China since at least the seventh century and has gained influence over the past 200 years. [3] [4]

In recent years, the number of Chinese Christians has increased significantly, particularly since the easing of restrictions on religious activity during economic reforms in the late 1970s; Christians were 4 million before 1949 (3 million Catholics and 1 million Protestants), and are in the tens of millions today. [5] Various statistical analyses have found that between 2% and 4% of the Chinese identify as Christian.

There are various terms used for God in the Chinese language, the most prevalent being Shangdi (上帝, literally, "Highest Emperor"), used commonly by Protestants and also by non-Christians, and Tianzhu (天主, literally, "Lord of Heaven"), which is most commonly favoured by Catholics. Shen (神), also widely used by Chinese Protestants, defines the gods or generative powers of nature in Chinese traditional religions . Historically, Christians have also adopted a variety of terms from the Chinese classics as referents to God, for example Ruler (主宰) and Creator (造物主).

 
 
 
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