Church and Reform | Ecclesiology | Academic Degree

A study of Pierre d’Ailly’s (1351-1420) views on bishops, theologians, and canon lawyers with special emphasis upon their individual status, office, and authority ...

The Church of England's Renewal & Reform programme, aimed at helping us become a growing Church for all people and for all places.

Reformed Christians are a small part of a much larger body of believers who love and serve Jesus Christ. We’re part of a family that includes Orthodox, Roman ...

A study of Pierre d’Ailly’s (1351-1420) views on bishops, theologians, and canon lawyers with special emphasis upon their individual status, office, and authority ...

The Church of England's Renewal & Reform programme, aimed at helping us become a growing Church for all people and for all places.

Reformed Christians are a small part of a much larger body of believers who love and serve Jesus Christ. We’re part of a family that includes Orthodox, Roman ...

Violet Soen is Professor of Early Modern History, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François are Professors of History of the Church and Theology, all at the Catholic University of Leuven.

Violet Soen, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François
Church, Censorship and Reform: Questions and New Answers Regarding the Early Modern Habsburg Netherlands

Renaud Adam
The Profession of Printer in the Southern Netherlands before the Reformation. Considerations on Professional, Religious and State Legislations (1473-1520)

This site makes some use of cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here ×

In the early nineteenth century, a succession of religious revivals collectively known as the Second Great Awakening remade the nation’s religious landscape. Revivalist preachers traveled on horseback, sharing the message of spiritual and moral renewal to as many as possible. Residents of urban centers, rural farmlands, and frontier territories alike flocked to religious revivals and camp meetings, where intense physical and emotional enthusiasm accompanied evangelical conversion.

The Second Great Awakening emerged in response to powerful intellectual and social currents. Camp meetings captured the democratizing spirit of the American Revolution, but revivals also provided a unifying moral order and new sense of spiritual community for Americans struggling with the great changes of the day. The market revolution, western expansion, and European immigration all challenged traditional bonds of authority, and evangelicalism promised equal measures of excitement and order. Revivals spread like wildfire throughout the United States, swelling church membership, spawning new Christian denominations, and inspiring social reform.

The reform movements that emerged in the United States during the first half of the nineteenth century were not American inventions. Instead, these movements were rooted in a transatlantic world where both sides of the ocean faced similar problems and together collaborated to find similar solutions. Many of the same factors that spurred American reformers to action—such as urbanization, industrialization, and class struggle—equally affected Europe. Reformers on both sides of the Atlantic visited and corresponded with one another. Exchanging ideas and building networks proved crucial to shared causes like abolition and women’s rights.

A study of Pierre d’Ailly’s (1351-1420) views on bishops, theologians, and canon lawyers with special emphasis upon their individual status, office, and authority ...

The Church of England's Renewal & Reform programme, aimed at helping us become a growing Church for all people and for all places.

Reformed Christians are a small part of a much larger body of believers who love and serve Jesus Christ. We’re part of a family that includes Orthodox, Roman ...

Violet Soen is Professor of Early Modern History, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François are Professors of History of the Church and Theology, all at the Catholic University of Leuven.

Violet Soen, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François
Church, Censorship and Reform: Questions and New Answers Regarding the Early Modern Habsburg Netherlands

Renaud Adam
The Profession of Printer in the Southern Netherlands before the Reformation. Considerations on Professional, Religious and State Legislations (1473-1520)

This site makes some use of cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here ×

In the early nineteenth century, a succession of religious revivals collectively known as the Second Great Awakening remade the nation’s religious landscape. Revivalist preachers traveled on horseback, sharing the message of spiritual and moral renewal to as many as possible. Residents of urban centers, rural farmlands, and frontier territories alike flocked to religious revivals and camp meetings, where intense physical and emotional enthusiasm accompanied evangelical conversion.

The Second Great Awakening emerged in response to powerful intellectual and social currents. Camp meetings captured the democratizing spirit of the American Revolution, but revivals also provided a unifying moral order and new sense of spiritual community for Americans struggling with the great changes of the day. The market revolution, western expansion, and European immigration all challenged traditional bonds of authority, and evangelicalism promised equal measures of excitement and order. Revivals spread like wildfire throughout the United States, swelling church membership, spawning new Christian denominations, and inspiring social reform.

The reform movements that emerged in the United States during the first half of the nineteenth century were not American inventions. Instead, these movements were rooted in a transatlantic world where both sides of the ocean faced similar problems and together collaborated to find similar solutions. Many of the same factors that spurred American reformers to action—such as urbanization, industrialization, and class struggle—equally affected Europe. Reformers on both sides of the Atlantic visited and corresponded with one another. Exchanging ideas and building networks proved crucial to shared causes like abolition and women’s rights.

Reformation , also called Protestant Reformation , the religious revolution that took place in the Western church in the 16th century. Its greatest leaders undoubtedly were Martin Luther and John Calvin . Having far-reaching political, economic, and social effects, the Reformation became the basis for the founding of Protestantism , one of the three major branches of Christianity .

…Christianization of society and culture. Initially the Protestant Reformers maintained the hope that they could accomplish the reformation of the doctrine and life of the church from within, but this proved impossible because of the intransigence of the church, the polemic of the Protestant movements, or the political and…

Another group of reformers, often though not altogether correctly referred to as “radical reformers,” insisted that baptism be performed not on infants but on adults who had professed their faith in Jesus. Called Anabaptists , they remained a marginal phenomenon in the 16th century but survived—despite fierce persecution—as Mennonites and Hutterites into the 21st century. Opponents of the ancient Trinitarian dogma made their appearance as well. Known as Socinians , after the name of their founder, they established flourishing congregations, especially in Poland.

Volume Editor: Henk van den Belt. Translator: Riemer A. Faber. General Editors: Andreas J. Beck, William den Boer & Riemer A. Faber

A study of Pierre d’Ailly’s (1351-1420) views on bishops, theologians, and canon lawyers with special emphasis upon their individual status, office, and authority ...

The Church of England's Renewal & Reform programme, aimed at helping us become a growing Church for all people and for all places.

Reformed Christians are a small part of a much larger body of believers who love and serve Jesus Christ. We’re part of a family that includes Orthodox, Roman ...

Violet Soen is Professor of Early Modern History, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François are Professors of History of the Church and Theology, all at the Catholic University of Leuven.

Violet Soen, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François
Church, Censorship and Reform: Questions and New Answers Regarding the Early Modern Habsburg Netherlands

Renaud Adam
The Profession of Printer in the Southern Netherlands before the Reformation. Considerations on Professional, Religious and State Legislations (1473-1520)

This site makes some use of cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here ×

In the early nineteenth century, a succession of religious revivals collectively known as the Second Great Awakening remade the nation’s religious landscape. Revivalist preachers traveled on horseback, sharing the message of spiritual and moral renewal to as many as possible. Residents of urban centers, rural farmlands, and frontier territories alike flocked to religious revivals and camp meetings, where intense physical and emotional enthusiasm accompanied evangelical conversion.

The Second Great Awakening emerged in response to powerful intellectual and social currents. Camp meetings captured the democratizing spirit of the American Revolution, but revivals also provided a unifying moral order and new sense of spiritual community for Americans struggling with the great changes of the day. The market revolution, western expansion, and European immigration all challenged traditional bonds of authority, and evangelicalism promised equal measures of excitement and order. Revivals spread like wildfire throughout the United States, swelling church membership, spawning new Christian denominations, and inspiring social reform.

The reform movements that emerged in the United States during the first half of the nineteenth century were not American inventions. Instead, these movements were rooted in a transatlantic world where both sides of the ocean faced similar problems and together collaborated to find similar solutions. Many of the same factors that spurred American reformers to action—such as urbanization, industrialization, and class struggle—equally affected Europe. Reformers on both sides of the Atlantic visited and corresponded with one another. Exchanging ideas and building networks proved crucial to shared causes like abolition and women’s rights.

Reformation , also called Protestant Reformation , the religious revolution that took place in the Western church in the 16th century. Its greatest leaders undoubtedly were Martin Luther and John Calvin . Having far-reaching political, economic, and social effects, the Reformation became the basis for the founding of Protestantism , one of the three major branches of Christianity .

…Christianization of society and culture. Initially the Protestant Reformers maintained the hope that they could accomplish the reformation of the doctrine and life of the church from within, but this proved impossible because of the intransigence of the church, the polemic of the Protestant movements, or the political and…

Another group of reformers, often though not altogether correctly referred to as “radical reformers,” insisted that baptism be performed not on infants but on adults who had professed their faith in Jesus. Called Anabaptists , they remained a marginal phenomenon in the 16th century but survived—despite fierce persecution—as Mennonites and Hutterites into the 21st century. Opponents of the ancient Trinitarian dogma made their appearance as well. Known as Socinians , after the name of their founder, they established flourishing congregations, especially in Poland.

A study of Pierre d’Ailly’s (1351-1420) views on bishops, theologians, and canon lawyers with special emphasis upon their individual status, office, and authority ...

The Church of England's Renewal & Reform programme, aimed at helping us become a growing Church for all people and for all places.

Reformed Christians are a small part of a much larger body of believers who love and serve Jesus Christ. We’re part of a family that includes Orthodox, Roman ...

Violet Soen is Professor of Early Modern History, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François are Professors of History of the Church and Theology, all at the Catholic University of Leuven.

Violet Soen, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François
Church, Censorship and Reform: Questions and New Answers Regarding the Early Modern Habsburg Netherlands

Renaud Adam
The Profession of Printer in the Southern Netherlands before the Reformation. Considerations on Professional, Religious and State Legislations (1473-1520)

A study of Pierre d’Ailly’s (1351-1420) views on bishops, theologians, and canon lawyers with special emphasis upon their individual status, office, and authority ...

The Church of England's Renewal & Reform programme, aimed at helping us become a growing Church for all people and for all places.

Reformed Christians are a small part of a much larger body of believers who love and serve Jesus Christ. We’re part of a family that includes Orthodox, Roman ...

Violet Soen is Professor of Early Modern History, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François are Professors of History of the Church and Theology, all at the Catholic University of Leuven.

Violet Soen, Dries Vanysacker and Wim François
Church, Censorship and Reform: Questions and New Answers Regarding the Early Modern Habsburg Netherlands

Renaud Adam
The Profession of Printer in the Southern Netherlands before the Reformation. Considerations on Professional, Religious and State Legislations (1473-1520)

This site makes some use of cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here ×

 
 
 
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