Amazon.com: wives and daughters book

Molly Gibson, the only daughter of a widowed doctor in the small provincial town of Hollingford, lost her mother when she was a child. Her father remarries wanting to give Molly the woman's presence he feels she lacks. To Molly, any stepmother would have been a shock, but the new Mrs. Gibson is a self-absorbed, petty widow, and Molly's unhappiness is compounded by the realisation that her father has come to regret his second marriage.

Although Molly resents her stepmother, she befriends her new step-sister, Cynthia, who is loveable, but worldly and troubling. The audiobook chronicles their maturation into womanhood within the confines of the gossiping and watchful society of Hollingford.

As Molly matures and falls in love she learns to judge people for what they are, not what they seem. Through Molly, the social values and changes of early 19th century England are brought to life in this timeless representation of human relationships. The audiobook is more than just a nostalgic story of village life, it offers an ironic critique of mid-Victorian society.

Molly Gibson, the only daughter of a widowed doctor in the small provincial town of Hollingford, lost her mother when she was a child. Her father remarries wanting to give Molly the woman's presence he feels she lacks. To Molly, any stepmother would have been a shock, but the new Mrs. Gibson is a self-absorbed, petty widow, and Molly's unhappiness is compounded by the realisation that her father has come to regret his second marriage.

Although Molly resents her stepmother, she befriends her new step-sister, Cynthia, who is loveable, but worldly and troubling. The audiobook chronicles their maturation into womanhood within the confines of the gossiping and watchful society of Hollingford.

As Molly matures and falls in love she learns to judge people for what they are, not what they seem. Through Molly, the social values and changes of early 19th century England are brought to life in this timeless representation of human relationships. The audiobook is more than just a nostalgic story of village life, it offers an ironic critique of mid-Victorian society.

This book was very long and I found myself wishing for more to happen. It seemed to drag on a little and I didn't enjoy the characters as much as her other stories I've read and there seemed to be a lack of tragedy in it.

Saying that however, my favorite character did die early on and she was fantastic. I enjoyed the Hamleys, and Lady Harriet and whenever people showed up to put "Clare" in her place. I think the weakest character was Molly who while she started off quite adventuresome and forthright she mostly petered out into a typical good and mild girl.

It was sad that Mrs. Gaskell died before she finished the book and sad that she died so young. There were some very touching moments in the story I just think it would have benefited from being more concise. Still I will continue to read more of her novels as I still think she is a great author.

Molly Gibson, the only daughter of a widowed doctor in the small provincial town of Hollingford, lost her mother when she was a child. Her father remarries wanting to give Molly the woman's presence he feels she lacks. To Molly, any stepmother would have been a shock, but the new Mrs. Gibson is a self-absorbed, petty widow, and Molly's unhappiness is compounded by the realisation that her father has come to regret his second marriage.

Although Molly resents her stepmother, she befriends her new step-sister, Cynthia, who is loveable, but worldly and troubling. The audiobook chronicles their maturation into womanhood within the confines of the gossiping and watchful society of Hollingford.

As Molly matures and falls in love she learns to judge people for what they are, not what they seem. Through Molly, the social values and changes of early 19th century England are brought to life in this timeless representation of human relationships. The audiobook is more than just a nostalgic story of village life, it offers an ironic critique of mid-Victorian society.

This book was very long and I found myself wishing for more to happen. It seemed to drag on a little and I didn't enjoy the characters as much as her other stories I've read and there seemed to be a lack of tragedy in it.

Saying that however, my favorite character did die early on and she was fantastic. I enjoyed the Hamleys, and Lady Harriet and whenever people showed up to put "Clare" in her place. I think the weakest character was Molly who while she started off quite adventuresome and forthright she mostly petered out into a typical good and mild girl.

It was sad that Mrs. Gaskell died before she finished the book and sad that she died so young. There were some very touching moments in the story I just think it would have benefited from being more concise. Still I will continue to read more of her novels as I still think she is a great author.

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