Song of Spider-Man: The Inside Story of the Most.

" Spider-Man " is the theme song of the 1967 cartoon show Spider-Man , composed by Academy Award winner Paul Francis Webster and Robert "Bob" Harris . The original song was recorded at RCA Studios in Toronto (where the cartoon was also produced) featuring 12 CBC vocalists (members of the Billy Van Singers, and Laurie Bower Singers groups) who added to the musical backing track supplied by RCA Studios, New York. The singers were paid only for the session and have had no residuals from its use since then.

A long-standing rumor claimed that the bassline for the Spider-Man theme was performed by jazz musician Charles Mingus ; however, Ralph Bakshi confirmed the rumor as being erroneous, stating that Mingus did not perform on the theme song. [1]

The 2002 Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 film adaptations featured characters as buskers performing the song; Jayce Bartok and Elyse Dinh respectively. Both films also feature the song at the very end of the credits: the 2002 film featured the 1967 version, while the 2004 film featured a re-recording by Michael Bublé (see below). 2007's Spider-Man 3 also featured the song's melody during the scene where Spider-Man arrives at a big celebration.

Hormones, acne, oh, and spider-webs are all apart of puberty for a young Peter Parker. The teenager from Queens experiences all of your typical boyhood things: crushes on girls, getting distracted in class, and feeling out of place. These coming-of-age moments were all likely kept in mind when selecting the song for the latest Marvel superhero trailer. The non-diegetic track plays once Peter opens his school locker, and stops when he crawls his room's ceiling in his suit, as if documenting his transition from student to super. So, what song plays in the Spider-Man: Homecoming trailer ? You've probably heard it before.  

The electropop song is " Time To Pretend " by MGMT. The song is a throwback, released in 2007, from the album Oracular Spectacular . It's appropriate that the song choice goes back in time, as we too backtrack into Spider-Man's adolescence. The track speaks to a fantasy of living a rockstar life, which is highly relatable to Peter's yearning to be a superhero. A few lyrics from the song read as follows:

Like the song, Peter is "fated to pretend" to be a normal kid. The song mimics the Queens kid's frustration with having to lead an ordinary life until he comes of age. Peter suffers from testosterone, teenage angst, and the knowledge that he is destined for greatness, so you can't blame the guy for feeling a little restless. Young Spidey gets to chill with Iron Man at night, and then glues himself back to a high school desk during the day; teetering back and forth from super to average must come with some unsettling side-effects.

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Glen Berger cut his teeth at Seattle's Annex Theatre back in the '90s. His plays since then include Underneath the Lintel, which has been staged more than two hundred times worldwide, been translated into eight languages, and won several Best Play...

" Spider-Man " is the theme song of the 1967 cartoon show Spider-Man , composed by Academy Award winner Paul Francis Webster and Robert "Bob" Harris . The original song was recorded at RCA Studios in Toronto (where the cartoon was also produced) featuring 12 CBC vocalists (members of the Billy Van Singers, and Laurie Bower Singers groups) who added to the musical backing track supplied by RCA Studios, New York. The singers were paid only for the session and have had no residuals from its use since then.

A long-standing rumor claimed that the bassline for the Spider-Man theme was performed by jazz musician Charles Mingus ; however, Ralph Bakshi confirmed the rumor as being erroneous, stating that Mingus did not perform on the theme song. [1]

The 2002 Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 film adaptations featured characters as buskers performing the song; Jayce Bartok and Elyse Dinh respectively. Both films also feature the song at the very end of the credits: the 2002 film featured the 1967 version, while the 2004 film featured a re-recording by Michael Bublé (see below). 2007's Spider-Man 3 also featured the song's melody during the scene where Spider-Man arrives at a big celebration.

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" Spider-Man " is the theme song of the 1967 cartoon show Spider-Man , composed by Academy Award winner Paul Francis Webster and Robert "Bob" Harris . The original song was recorded at RCA Studios in Toronto (where the cartoon was also produced) featuring 12 CBC vocalists (members of the Billy Van Singers, and Laurie Bower Singers groups) who added to the musical backing track supplied by RCA Studios, New York. The singers were paid only for the session and have had no residuals from its use since then.

A long-standing rumor claimed that the bassline for the Spider-Man theme was performed by jazz musician Charles Mingus ; however, Ralph Bakshi confirmed the rumor as being erroneous, stating that Mingus did not perform on the theme song. [1]

The 2002 Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 film adaptations featured characters as buskers performing the song; Jayce Bartok and Elyse Dinh respectively. Both films also feature the song at the very end of the credits: the 2002 film featured the 1967 version, while the 2004 film featured a re-recording by Michael Bublé (see below). 2007's Spider-Man 3 also featured the song's melody during the scene where Spider-Man arrives at a big celebration.

Hormones, acne, oh, and spider-webs are all apart of puberty for a young Peter Parker. The teenager from Queens experiences all of your typical boyhood things: crushes on girls, getting distracted in class, and feeling out of place. These coming-of-age moments were all likely kept in mind when selecting the song for the latest Marvel superhero trailer. The non-diegetic track plays once Peter opens his school locker, and stops when he crawls his room's ceiling in his suit, as if documenting his transition from student to super. So, what song plays in the Spider-Man: Homecoming trailer ? You've probably heard it before.  

The electropop song is " Time To Pretend " by MGMT. The song is a throwback, released in 2007, from the album Oracular Spectacular . It's appropriate that the song choice goes back in time, as we too backtrack into Spider-Man's adolescence. The track speaks to a fantasy of living a rockstar life, which is highly relatable to Peter's yearning to be a superhero. A few lyrics from the song read as follows:

Like the song, Peter is "fated to pretend" to be a normal kid. The song mimics the Queens kid's frustration with having to lead an ordinary life until he comes of age. Peter suffers from testosterone, teenage angst, and the knowledge that he is destined for greatness, so you can't blame the guy for feeling a little restless. Young Spidey gets to chill with Iron Man at night, and then glues himself back to a high school desk during the day; teetering back and forth from super to average must come with some unsettling side-effects.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Glen Berger cut his teeth at Seattle's Annex Theatre back in the '90s. His plays since then include Underneath the Lintel, which has been staged more than two hundred times worldwide, been translated into eight languages, and won several Best Play...

" Spider-Man " is the theme song of the 1967 cartoon show Spider-Man , composed by Academy Award winner Paul Francis Webster and Robert "Bob" Harris . The original song was recorded at RCA Studios in Toronto (where the cartoon was also produced) featuring 12 CBC vocalists (members of the Billy Van Singers, and Laurie Bower Singers groups) who added to the musical backing track supplied by RCA Studios, New York. The singers were paid only for the session and have had no residuals from its use since then.

A long-standing rumor claimed that the bassline for the Spider-Man theme was performed by jazz musician Charles Mingus ; however, Ralph Bakshi confirmed the rumor as being erroneous, stating that Mingus did not perform on the theme song. [1]

The 2002 Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 film adaptations featured characters as buskers performing the song; Jayce Bartok and Elyse Dinh respectively. Both films also feature the song at the very end of the credits: the 2002 film featured the 1967 version, while the 2004 film featured a re-recording by Michael Bublé (see below). 2007's Spider-Man 3 also featured the song's melody during the scene where Spider-Man arrives at a big celebration.

" Spider-Man " is the theme song of the 1967 cartoon show Spider-Man , composed by Academy Award winner Paul Francis Webster and Robert "Bob" Harris . The original song was recorded at RCA Studios in Toronto (where the cartoon was also produced) featuring 12 CBC vocalists (members of the Billy Van Singers, and Laurie Bower Singers groups) who added to the musical backing track supplied by RCA Studios, New York. The singers were paid only for the session and have had no residuals from its use since then.

A long-standing rumor claimed that the bassline for the Spider-Man theme was performed by jazz musician Charles Mingus ; however, Ralph Bakshi confirmed the rumor as being erroneous, stating that Mingus did not perform on the theme song. [1]

The 2002 Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 film adaptations featured characters as buskers performing the song; Jayce Bartok and Elyse Dinh respectively. Both films also feature the song at the very end of the credits: the 2002 film featured the 1967 version, while the 2004 film featured a re-recording by Michael Bublé (see below). 2007's Spider-Man 3 also featured the song's melody during the scene where Spider-Man arrives at a big celebration.

Hormones, acne, oh, and spider-webs are all apart of puberty for a young Peter Parker. The teenager from Queens experiences all of your typical boyhood things: crushes on girls, getting distracted in class, and feeling out of place. These coming-of-age moments were all likely kept in mind when selecting the song for the latest Marvel superhero trailer. The non-diegetic track plays once Peter opens his school locker, and stops when he crawls his room's ceiling in his suit, as if documenting his transition from student to super. So, what song plays in the Spider-Man: Homecoming trailer ? You've probably heard it before.  

The electropop song is " Time To Pretend " by MGMT. The song is a throwback, released in 2007, from the album Oracular Spectacular . It's appropriate that the song choice goes back in time, as we too backtrack into Spider-Man's adolescence. The track speaks to a fantasy of living a rockstar life, which is highly relatable to Peter's yearning to be a superhero. A few lyrics from the song read as follows:

Like the song, Peter is "fated to pretend" to be a normal kid. The song mimics the Queens kid's frustration with having to lead an ordinary life until he comes of age. Peter suffers from testosterone, teenage angst, and the knowledge that he is destined for greatness, so you can't blame the guy for feeling a little restless. Young Spidey gets to chill with Iron Man at night, and then glues himself back to a high school desk during the day; teetering back and forth from super to average must come with some unsettling side-effects.

" Spider-Man " is the theme song of the 1967 cartoon show Spider-Man , composed by Academy Award winner Paul Francis Webster and Robert "Bob" Harris . The original song was recorded at RCA Studios in Toronto (where the cartoon was also produced) featuring 12 CBC vocalists (members of the Billy Van Singers, and Laurie Bower Singers groups) who added to the musical backing track supplied by RCA Studios, New York. The singers were paid only for the session and have had no residuals from its use since then.

A long-standing rumor claimed that the bassline for the Spider-Man theme was performed by jazz musician Charles Mingus ; however, Ralph Bakshi confirmed the rumor as being erroneous, stating that Mingus did not perform on the theme song. [1]

The 2002 Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 film adaptations featured characters as buskers performing the song; Jayce Bartok and Elyse Dinh respectively. Both films also feature the song at the very end of the credits: the 2002 film featured the 1967 version, while the 2004 film featured a re-recording by Michael Bublé (see below). 2007's Spider-Man 3 also featured the song's melody during the scene where Spider-Man arrives at a big celebration.

Hormones, acne, oh, and spider-webs are all apart of puberty for a young Peter Parker. The teenager from Queens experiences all of your typical boyhood things: crushes on girls, getting distracted in class, and feeling out of place. These coming-of-age moments were all likely kept in mind when selecting the song for the latest Marvel superhero trailer. The non-diegetic track plays once Peter opens his school locker, and stops when he crawls his room's ceiling in his suit, as if documenting his transition from student to super. So, what song plays in the Spider-Man: Homecoming trailer ? You've probably heard it before.  

The electropop song is " Time To Pretend " by MGMT. The song is a throwback, released in 2007, from the album Oracular Spectacular . It's appropriate that the song choice goes back in time, as we too backtrack into Spider-Man's adolescence. The track speaks to a fantasy of living a rockstar life, which is highly relatable to Peter's yearning to be a superhero. A few lyrics from the song read as follows:

Like the song, Peter is "fated to pretend" to be a normal kid. The song mimics the Queens kid's frustration with having to lead an ordinary life until he comes of age. Peter suffers from testosterone, teenage angst, and the knowledge that he is destined for greatness, so you can't blame the guy for feeling a little restless. Young Spidey gets to chill with Iron Man at night, and then glues himself back to a high school desk during the day; teetering back and forth from super to average must come with some unsettling side-effects.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Glen Berger cut his teeth at Seattle's Annex Theatre back in the '90s. His plays since then include Underneath the Lintel, which has been staged more than two hundred times worldwide, been translated into eight languages, and won several Best Play...

" Spider-Man " is the theme song of the 1967 cartoon show Spider-Man , composed by Academy Award winner Paul Francis Webster and Robert "Bob" Harris . The original song was recorded at RCA Studios in Toronto (where the cartoon was also produced) featuring 12 CBC vocalists (members of the Billy Van Singers, and Laurie Bower Singers groups) who added to the musical backing track supplied by RCA Studios, New York. The singers were paid only for the session and have had no residuals from its use since then.

A long-standing rumor claimed that the bassline for the Spider-Man theme was performed by jazz musician Charles Mingus ; however, Ralph Bakshi confirmed the rumor as being erroneous, stating that Mingus did not perform on the theme song. [1]

The 2002 Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 film adaptations featured characters as buskers performing the song; Jayce Bartok and Elyse Dinh respectively. Both films also feature the song at the very end of the credits: the 2002 film featured the 1967 version, while the 2004 film featured a re-recording by Michael Bublé (see below). 2007's Spider-Man 3 also featured the song's melody during the scene where Spider-Man arrives at a big celebration.

 
 
 
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