Loopers: A Caddie s Twenty-Year Golf Odyssey: John Dunn.

This year I had the pleasure of playing a few private courses and had a caddie on my bag.  I was nervous at first but after a few holes it was fun.  Yes, it was nice to have someone else provide valuable information, like when to layup or go for the hole.  It was a treat to have someone rake the bunker and all the other small things they do to make your round enjoyable. What really added to the “fun” was the personalities and story telling of the caddies.  And that made me want to know more about caddies.

I have read two books and both are worth reading if you are an avid golf fan.  The books are very different. The first book is “ An American Caddie in St. Andrews ” by Oliver Horovitz. The second book is “ Loppers: A Caddie’s Twenty-Year Golf Odyssey ” by John Dunn.

Both men have a passion for the sport we all love and reveal that if you are lucky you get to combine your passion with your job. Read both books and you will be exposed to very different roads taken in a very unique career.

This year I had the pleasure of playing a few private courses and had a caddie on my bag.  I was nervous at first but after a few holes it was fun.  Yes, it was nice to have someone else provide valuable information, like when to layup or go for the hole.  It was a treat to have someone rake the bunker and all the other small things they do to make your round enjoyable. What really added to the “fun” was the personalities and story telling of the caddies.  And that made me want to know more about caddies.

I have read two books and both are worth reading if you are an avid golf fan.  The books are very different. The first book is “ An American Caddie in St. Andrews ” by Oliver Horovitz. The second book is “ Loppers: A Caddie’s Twenty-Year Golf Odyssey ” by John Dunn.

Both men have a passion for the sport we all love and reveal that if you are lucky you get to combine your passion with your job. Read both books and you will be exposed to very different roads taken in a very unique career.

It has been awhile since I’ve last reviewed a golf book on this blog. Simply put, there are a TON of golf books out there from which to choose. Most aren’t any good, either. However, John Dunn’s autobiographical Loopers: A Caddie’s Twenty-Year Golf Odyssey is a pleasant, engaging read that I found difficult to put down.

Written in the style of a journal of sorts, Dunn recalls twenty years of his life as a country club caddie traveling up and down the east coast. Saturated in humor and (at times) crass language,  Loopers offers the reader a look inside the mind of a caddie as he matures into young adulthood. Having worked as a caddie myself for many years, I found Dunn’s memoirs touching and hilarious as I could see myself in his shoes throughout the book.

What I liked most about  Loopers were the underlying serious tones strategically placed throughout the pages. For example, Dunn shares a story about a fellow caddie who is of shorter stature. After a day of visiting Augusta National for The Masters, both young men pull over to a cemetery to share a bottle of whiskey. Dunn eventually creeps up on his friend to scare him, which goes horribly wrong and taps into an unknown hidden fear in the other caddie. Dunn then describes the car ride home as his friend opens up about his depression and lack of self-worth; an event that introduces Dunn to the dark side of caddying.

 “ Loopers is a wildly original journey through the golf world, and a fascinating glimpse into the secret lives of caddies. John Dunn is the perfect tour guide—by turns droll and introspective, imbued with a reverence for the game and a heroic wanderlust that takes him to many of golf’s sacred spots. Reading this wonderful book made me want to fall in love with golf again . . and to hit the road, in search of the adventure and self-discovery that Dunn found.”
— Alan Shipnuck, senior writer, Sports Illustrated , and author of Bud, Sweat & Tees    

“Is caddying a vocation or a permanent vacation? John Dunn has an amazing talent to get the reader to ‘enter the writer’s tent’ and imagine you’re right there with him in St. Andrews, at Bandon Dunes, at Shinnecock, at Olympic.  It’s a trip work taking.”  — Mike Keiser, owner, Bandon Dunes Golf Resort

“John Dunn turns toting the golf bags of the rich into an evocative and often very funny meditation on class and purpose. The serendipity he prizes about caddying turns out, as he slides into middle age, to be doubtful compensation for a more conventional career. The mixed blessings of vagabondage, and Dunn’s slow-motion struggle with his disapproving father, give his memoir its tense and mournful gravity.”
— Tad Friend, author of Cheerful Money  

This year I had the pleasure of playing a few private courses and had a caddie on my bag.  I was nervous at first but after a few holes it was fun.  Yes, it was nice to have someone else provide valuable information, like when to layup or go for the hole.  It was a treat to have someone rake the bunker and all the other small things they do to make your round enjoyable. What really added to the “fun” was the personalities and story telling of the caddies.  And that made me want to know more about caddies.

I have read two books and both are worth reading if you are an avid golf fan.  The books are very different. The first book is “ An American Caddie in St. Andrews ” by Oliver Horovitz. The second book is “ Loppers: A Caddie’s Twenty-Year Golf Odyssey ” by John Dunn.

Both men have a passion for the sport we all love and reveal that if you are lucky you get to combine your passion with your job. Read both books and you will be exposed to very different roads taken in a very unique career.

It has been awhile since I’ve last reviewed a golf book on this blog. Simply put, there are a TON of golf books out there from which to choose. Most aren’t any good, either. However, John Dunn’s autobiographical Loopers: A Caddie’s Twenty-Year Golf Odyssey is a pleasant, engaging read that I found difficult to put down.

Written in the style of a journal of sorts, Dunn recalls twenty years of his life as a country club caddie traveling up and down the east coast. Saturated in humor and (at times) crass language,  Loopers offers the reader a look inside the mind of a caddie as he matures into young adulthood. Having worked as a caddie myself for many years, I found Dunn’s memoirs touching and hilarious as I could see myself in his shoes throughout the book.

What I liked most about  Loopers were the underlying serious tones strategically placed throughout the pages. For example, Dunn shares a story about a fellow caddie who is of shorter stature. After a day of visiting Augusta National for The Masters, both young men pull over to a cemetery to share a bottle of whiskey. Dunn eventually creeps up on his friend to scare him, which goes horribly wrong and taps into an unknown hidden fear in the other caddie. Dunn then describes the car ride home as his friend opens up about his depression and lack of self-worth; an event that introduces Dunn to the dark side of caddying.

 
 
 
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