Parting of the Waters - Wikipedia

From: Appalachian Heritage
Volume 22, Number 4, Fall 1994
pp. 21-25 | 10.1353/aph.1994.0075

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

From: Appalachian Heritage
Volume 22, Number 4, Fall 1994
pp. 21-25 | 10.1353/aph.1994.0075

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

This winter has been the worst ever. The tides are so high that the city's old defenses are being overwhelmed. Venice could be gone by the end of the century.

In a conspiracy of the Adriatic, the moon and the wind turns the city of serenity into a blocked sink. Stores are flooded and hotels are transformed into sinking ocean liners.

Napoleon considered The Piazza San Marco as Europe's finest drawing room. A hundred years ago, the Piazza got flooded seven times a year. But recently the waters have been coming 100 times a year.

In Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963 there were some children who wanted to be free. They were tired of being shut out of some restaurants and swimming pools and playgrounds because of the color of their skin. They were tired of being treated unfairly because they were black.

These children heard about a man named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who was leading a march to protest the unfair treatment of blacks. These children went and told Dr. King that they wanted to march for freedom. Dr. King frowned because he knew these marches were dangerous. Sometimes the police dogs would attack freedom marchers. Sometimes the freedom marchers would be beaten with clubs. And sometimes the police would turn on high-powered fire hoses that knocked people down to the ground.

Dr. King did not want to let the children march because he feared for their safety. But when he looked into their eyes, he could see the light of freedom. He knew that these children would march even if he said no. And so he said, “I’d be happy to have you march for freedom.”

From: Appalachian Heritage
Volume 22, Number 4, Fall 1994
pp. 21-25 | 10.1353/aph.1994.0075

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

This winter has been the worst ever. The tides are so high that the city's old defenses are being overwhelmed. Venice could be gone by the end of the century.

In a conspiracy of the Adriatic, the moon and the wind turns the city of serenity into a blocked sink. Stores are flooded and hotels are transformed into sinking ocean liners.

Napoleon considered The Piazza San Marco as Europe's finest drawing room. A hundred years ago, the Piazza got flooded seven times a year. But recently the waters have been coming 100 times a year.

In Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963 there were some children who wanted to be free. They were tired of being shut out of some restaurants and swimming pools and playgrounds because of the color of their skin. They were tired of being treated unfairly because they were black.

These children heard about a man named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who was leading a march to protest the unfair treatment of blacks. These children went and told Dr. King that they wanted to march for freedom. Dr. King frowned because he knew these marches were dangerous. Sometimes the police dogs would attack freedom marchers. Sometimes the freedom marchers would be beaten with clubs. And sometimes the police would turn on high-powered fire hoses that knocked people down to the ground.

Dr. King did not want to let the children march because he feared for their safety. But when he looked into their eyes, he could see the light of freedom. He knew that these children would march even if he said no. And so he said, “I’d be happy to have you march for freedom.”

Interested in rare and collectible books? Booksellers from around the world showcase some of their finest in Biblio's rare book room .

George Romero co-wrote and directed Night of the Living Dead in 1968, a film that inspired the modern zombie craze and made an indelible mark on American cinema. Come this way, horror fan...

For a biblical stream whose name evokes divine tranquillity, the Jordan River is nobody's idea of peace on Earth. From its rowdy headwaters near the war-scarred slopes of Mount Hermon to the foamy, coffee-colored sludge at the Dead Sea some 200 miles downstream, the Jordan is fighting for survival in a tough neighborhood—the kind of place where nations might spike the riverbank with land mines, or go to war over a sandbar. Water has always been precious in this arid region, but a six-year drought and expanding population conspire to make it a fresh source of conflict among the Israelis, Palestinians, and Jordanians vying for the river's life-giving supply.

Armed confrontations over the Jordan date to the founding of Israel in 1948 and the recognition that sources of the country's needed water supply lay outside its borders. Its survival depended on the Jordan River, with its headwaters in Syria and Lebanon, its waters stored in the Sea of Galilee, and the tributaries that flow into it from neighboring countries.

Israel's neighbors face a similar situation. Their survival is no less at stake—which makes the line between war and peace here very fine indeed. In the 1960s Israeli air strikes after Syria attempted to divert the Baniyas River (one of the Jordan's headwaters in the Golan Heights), together with Arab attacks on Israel's National Water Carrier project, lit fuses for the Six Day War. Israel and Jordan nearly came to blows over a sandbar in the Yarmuk River in 1979. And in 2002 Israel threatened to shell agricultural pumping stations on the Hasbani, another of the headwaters in southern Lebanon.

From: Appalachian Heritage
Volume 22, Number 4, Fall 1994
pp. 21-25 | 10.1353/aph.1994.0075

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

This winter has been the worst ever. The tides are so high that the city's old defenses are being overwhelmed. Venice could be gone by the end of the century.

In a conspiracy of the Adriatic, the moon and the wind turns the city of serenity into a blocked sink. Stores are flooded and hotels are transformed into sinking ocean liners.

Napoleon considered The Piazza San Marco as Europe's finest drawing room. A hundred years ago, the Piazza got flooded seven times a year. But recently the waters have been coming 100 times a year.

In Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963 there were some children who wanted to be free. They were tired of being shut out of some restaurants and swimming pools and playgrounds because of the color of their skin. They were tired of being treated unfairly because they were black.

These children heard about a man named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who was leading a march to protest the unfair treatment of blacks. These children went and told Dr. King that they wanted to march for freedom. Dr. King frowned because he knew these marches were dangerous. Sometimes the police dogs would attack freedom marchers. Sometimes the freedom marchers would be beaten with clubs. And sometimes the police would turn on high-powered fire hoses that knocked people down to the ground.

Dr. King did not want to let the children march because he feared for their safety. But when he looked into their eyes, he could see the light of freedom. He knew that these children would march even if he said no. And so he said, “I’d be happy to have you march for freedom.”

Interested in rare and collectible books? Booksellers from around the world showcase some of their finest in Biblio's rare book room .

George Romero co-wrote and directed Night of the Living Dead in 1968, a film that inspired the modern zombie craze and made an indelible mark on American cinema. Come this way, horror fan...

From: Appalachian Heritage
Volume 22, Number 4, Fall 1994
pp. 21-25 | 10.1353/aph.1994.0075

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Project MUSE | 2715 North Charles Street | Baltimore, Maryland USA 21218 | (410) 516-6989 | About | Contact | Help | Tools | Order | Accessibility

This winter has been the worst ever. The tides are so high that the city's old defenses are being overwhelmed. Venice could be gone by the end of the century.

In a conspiracy of the Adriatic, the moon and the wind turns the city of serenity into a blocked sink. Stores are flooded and hotels are transformed into sinking ocean liners.

Napoleon considered The Piazza San Marco as Europe's finest drawing room. A hundred years ago, the Piazza got flooded seven times a year. But recently the waters have been coming 100 times a year.

 
 
 
51KZAc0yQUL