What s Age Got to Do With It?: Living Your Healthiest and.

Anyone who has ever been under the age of 25 has heard it numerous times, “You’ll understand once you’re my age.” Why is it almost impossible to have a discussion with someone older than you without age being brought into it? No matter how well researched and factual the statement you bring to the discussion is, it’s all over after one quick, dismissive, ageist comment.

I consider myself incredibly lucky to have friends and family members with differing viewpoints from my own because I believe a person can gain a lot from having intellectual conversations with others. So long as both parties respect one another, debating can truly benefit both people, educating one on opposing viewpoints. This is the reason why I’ve always found it confusing why we are taught to hold a higher level of respect to those who are older than us.

Time and time again the age old phrase is brought up, “Respect your elders.” It is my belief that age should not infringe on my ability to be given respect. Though this might seem controversial to some: why should respect be something you can only gain with age?

Margo D. Maine, PhD, Adapted from The Body Myth: Adult Women and the Pressure To Be Perfect by Maine & Kelly (John Wiley, 2005)

Once again, the old rules about eating disorders are no longer useful, but the dominant thinking of both the public and professionals does not reflect current reality. Western women live in a culture of Body Wars (Maine, 2000) that do not end when they turn 25 or 30. Just as women become invisible as they age, their problems are also discounted, minimized, and ignored. The picture of a young, vibrant teenager who succumbs to an eating disorder is tragic, but eating disorders are just as destructive in the lives of adult women.

Anyone who has ever been under the age of 25 has heard it numerous times, “You’ll understand once you’re my age.” Why is it almost impossible to have a discussion with someone older than you without age being brought into it? No matter how well researched and factual the statement you bring to the discussion is, it’s all over after one quick, dismissive, ageist comment.

I consider myself incredibly lucky to have friends and family members with differing viewpoints from my own because I believe a person can gain a lot from having intellectual conversations with others. So long as both parties respect one another, debating can truly benefit both people, educating one on opposing viewpoints. This is the reason why I’ve always found it confusing why we are taught to hold a higher level of respect to those who are older than us.

Time and time again the age old phrase is brought up, “Respect your elders.” It is my belief that age should not infringe on my ability to be given respect. Though this might seem controversial to some: why should respect be something you can only gain with age?

Anyone who has ever been under the age of 25 has heard it numerous times, “You’ll understand once you’re my age.” Why is it almost impossible to have a discussion with someone older than you without age being brought into it? No matter how well researched and factual the statement you bring to the discussion is, it’s all over after one quick, dismissive, ageist comment.

I consider myself incredibly lucky to have friends and family members with differing viewpoints from my own because I believe a person can gain a lot from having intellectual conversations with others. So long as both parties respect one another, debating can truly benefit both people, educating one on opposing viewpoints. This is the reason why I’ve always found it confusing why we are taught to hold a higher level of respect to those who are older than us.

Time and time again the age old phrase is brought up, “Respect your elders.” It is my belief that age should not infringe on my ability to be given respect. Though this might seem controversial to some: why should respect be something you can only gain with age?

Margo D. Maine, PhD, Adapted from The Body Myth: Adult Women and the Pressure To Be Perfect by Maine & Kelly (John Wiley, 2005)

Once again, the old rules about eating disorders are no longer useful, but the dominant thinking of both the public and professionals does not reflect current reality. Western women live in a culture of Body Wars (Maine, 2000) that do not end when they turn 25 or 30. Just as women become invisible as they age, their problems are also discounted, minimized, and ignored. The picture of a young, vibrant teenager who succumbs to an eating disorder is tragic, but eating disorders are just as destructive in the lives of adult women.

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“We’re all in boxes — you, me, that woman in the window,” says Shabana Azmi in the opening frame of the trailer for Aparna Sen’s next directorial, Sonata. The movie itself seems to be a way for the women portrayed in it to break out the ‘boxes’ designated to them by society.  It becomes apparent from the trailer that none of the three women have been slotted into the roles that are usually reserved for older women in Bollywood movies — those of  the mother, or mother-in-law, usually one-dimensional, and without much scope for growth.

Sonata is not the only movie, which seeks to explore sexual liberation in older women. Lipstick Under My Burkha, which has come into the limelight for its altercations with the CBFC, also portrays the love affair of Ratna Pathak Shah with a much younger man, while in Ramesh Sippy’s next film, Shimla Mirchi, Hema Malini also reportedly makes a comeback as a woman in love with a younger man. While the trend of expanding roles and looking beyond traditional tropes is something that veteran actresses in the industry have welcomed, they also feel that more films of this nature are long overdue.

“I think the reason why the plot for Sonata works is because people are not used to seeing cinema like this. You have to remember, though, that the film was originally a play by Mahesh Elkunchwar and in theatre, you have enough freedom of expression and this would not be considered unusual at all,” says Lilette Dubey, who plays one of the leading ladies of Sonata.

Anyone who has ever been under the age of 25 has heard it numerous times, “You’ll understand once you’re my age.” Why is it almost impossible to have a discussion with someone older than you without age being brought into it? No matter how well researched and factual the statement you bring to the discussion is, it’s all over after one quick, dismissive, ageist comment.

I consider myself incredibly lucky to have friends and family members with differing viewpoints from my own because I believe a person can gain a lot from having intellectual conversations with others. So long as both parties respect one another, debating can truly benefit both people, educating one on opposing viewpoints. This is the reason why I’ve always found it confusing why we are taught to hold a higher level of respect to those who are older than us.

Time and time again the age old phrase is brought up, “Respect your elders.” It is my belief that age should not infringe on my ability to be given respect. Though this might seem controversial to some: why should respect be something you can only gain with age?

Margo D. Maine, PhD, Adapted from The Body Myth: Adult Women and the Pressure To Be Perfect by Maine & Kelly (John Wiley, 2005)

Once again, the old rules about eating disorders are no longer useful, but the dominant thinking of both the public and professionals does not reflect current reality. Western women live in a culture of Body Wars (Maine, 2000) that do not end when they turn 25 or 30. Just as women become invisible as they age, their problems are also discounted, minimized, and ignored. The picture of a young, vibrant teenager who succumbs to an eating disorder is tragic, but eating disorders are just as destructive in the lives of adult women.

By registering you agree to our privacy policy , terms & conditions and to receive occasional emails from Ad Age. You may unsubscribe at any time.

 
 
 
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