Medical Encyclopedia: MedlinePlus

Contributing Computer and Graphics Specialists:
Julie L. Bates
Erin L. Berg
Teresa Ann Knutson Choi
Dawn M. Finney
Robert D. Lelonek, Jr.
Paul C. Reimann

Peer Review Status: Internally Peer Reviewed
First Published: January 1996
Last Revised: March 24, 2015 - This work is updated continuously.

"The human features and countenance, although composed of some ten parts or a little more, are so fashioned that among so many thousands of men there are no two in existence who cannot be distinguished from one another. Book 7, Sect 8."
Pliny the Elder, AD 23-79.

Contributing Computer and Graphics Specialists:
Julie L. Bates
Erin L. Berg
Teresa Ann Knutson Choi
Dawn M. Finney
Robert D. Lelonek, Jr.
Paul C. Reimann

Peer Review Status: Internally Peer Reviewed
First Published: January 1996
Last Revised: March 24, 2015 - This work is updated continuously.

"The human features and countenance, although composed of some ten parts or a little more, are so fashioned that among so many thousands of men there are no two in existence who cannot be distinguished from one another. Book 7, Sect 8."
Pliny the Elder, AD 23-79.

A broom is a cleaning tool consisting of usually stiff fibers (often made of materials such as plastic, hair, or corn husks) attached to, and roughly parallel to, a cylindrical handle , the broomstick . It is thus a variety of brush with a long handle. It is commonly used in combination with a dustpan .

A distinction is made between a "hard broom" and a "soft broom". Soft brooms are for sweeping walls of cobwebs and spiders . Hard brooms are for sweeping dirt off sidewalks.

The word "broom" derives from the name of certain thorny shrubs ( Genista and others) used for sweeping. [1] The name of the shrubs began to be used for the household implement in Late Middle English and gradually replaced the earlier besom during the Early Modern English period. The song Buy Broom Buzzems (by William Purvis 1752–1832) still refers to the "broom besom" as one type of besom (i.e. "a besom made from broom").

Contributing Computer and Graphics Specialists:
Julie L. Bates
Erin L. Berg
Teresa Ann Knutson Choi
Dawn M. Finney
Robert D. Lelonek, Jr.
Paul C. Reimann

Peer Review Status: Internally Peer Reviewed
First Published: January 1996
Last Revised: March 24, 2015 - This work is updated continuously.

"The human features and countenance, although composed of some ten parts or a little more, are so fashioned that among so many thousands of men there are no two in existence who cannot be distinguished from one another. Book 7, Sect 8."
Pliny the Elder, AD 23-79.

A broom is a cleaning tool consisting of usually stiff fibers (often made of materials such as plastic, hair, or corn husks) attached to, and roughly parallel to, a cylindrical handle , the broomstick . It is thus a variety of brush with a long handle. It is commonly used in combination with a dustpan .

A distinction is made between a "hard broom" and a "soft broom". Soft brooms are for sweeping walls of cobwebs and spiders . Hard brooms are for sweeping dirt off sidewalks.

The word "broom" derives from the name of certain thorny shrubs ( Genista and others) used for sweeping. [1] The name of the shrubs began to be used for the household implement in Late Middle English and gradually replaced the earlier besom during the Early Modern English period. The song Buy Broom Buzzems (by William Purvis 1752–1832) still refers to the "broom besom" as one type of besom (i.e. "a besom made from broom").


The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft was a weekly magazine by Aerospace Publishing/ Orbis Publishing that was published in the UK (and sold in other countries too) in the early 1980s. [1] The magazine was intended to eventually make up a multi-volume encyclopedia dedicated to aviation. Starting in 1982 the magazine lasted for 216 issues, each of 20 pages (plus the cover), making up 18 volumes (4280 pages). [1] The first two issues were sold together for the price of one, subsequent issues were sold on their own.

Empty binders for each volume (set of 12 issues) were also sold. These binders were dark blue in colour and contained the imprint of a Panavia Tornado on the front. They held the issues using a metal strip that was threaded through the staples of each issue to hold them in place. Each issue consisted of four separate sections.

The final two issues (215 and 216) gave the index for the encyclopedia. A contents was also given with these final issues that was intended to be put into the start of volume 1. The magazine ceased publication in 1985. [1]

 
 
 
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