excerpt from Poet Be Like God - Jacket 7

The first biography of poet Jack Spicer (1925-1965), a key figure in San Francisco’s gay cultural scene and in the development of American avant garde poetries.

Jack Spicer, unlike his contemporaries Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, and Gary Snyder, was a poet who disdained publishing and relished his role as a social outcast. He died in 1965 virtually unrecognized, yet in the following years his work and thought have attracted and intrigued an international audience. Now this comprehensive biography gives a pivotal poet his due. Based on interviews with scores of Spicer's contemporaries, Poet Be Like God details the most intimate aspects of Spicer's life—his family, his friends, his lovers—illuminating not only the man but also many of his poems.

Such illumination extends also to the works of others whom Spicer came to know, including the writers Frank O'Hara, Robert Duncan, Denise Levertov, Helen Adam, Robin Blaser, Charles Olson, Philip K. Dick, Richard Brautigan, and Marianne Moore and the painters Jess, Fran Herndon, and Jay DeFeo. The resulting narrative, an engaging chronicle of the San Francisco Renaissance and the emergence of the North Beach gay scene during the 50s and 60s, will be indispensable reading for students of American literature and gay studies.

Musical kinships are formed over time, not overnight. Artists benefit the most from slowing developing a rapport with one another, and working toward finding a natural creative middle ground; not abruptly throwing together a full-length project in the span of a few months. It’s very similar to how Marvel has handled the Avenger films vis-à-vis DC’s Justice League. One was built gradually, within a universe that allowed the characters to grow and crossover, whereas the other went full sprint toward a blockbuster climax that has, so far, failed to create any magic or connection between its heroes.

The anticipation for Huncho Jack has been high since the project was first announced last December, and consistent promotional “coming soon” tweets kept the feverish demand high. As the last scheduled collaborative album of the year, Huncho Jack, Jack Huncho could break a streak of rather lackluster duo performances. I'd like to imagine I just wrote that into existance.

The album art by Ralph Steadman is a wonderful first impression. If the music is as impressive as the cover than  Huncho Jack, Jack Huncho will be a treat.

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The first biography of poet Jack Spicer (1925-1965), a key figure in San Francisco’s gay cultural scene and in the development of American avant garde poetries.

Jack Spicer, unlike his contemporaries Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, and Gary Snyder, was a poet who disdained publishing and relished his role as a social outcast. He died in 1965 virtually unrecognized, yet in the following years his work and thought have attracted and intrigued an international audience. Now this comprehensive biography gives a pivotal poet his due. Based on interviews with scores of Spicer's contemporaries, Poet Be Like God details the most intimate aspects of Spicer's life—his family, his friends, his lovers—illuminating not only the man but also many of his poems.

Such illumination extends also to the works of others whom Spicer came to know, including the writers Frank O'Hara, Robert Duncan, Denise Levertov, Helen Adam, Robin Blaser, Charles Olson, Philip K. Dick, Richard Brautigan, and Marianne Moore and the painters Jess, Fran Herndon, and Jay DeFeo. The resulting narrative, an engaging chronicle of the San Francisco Renaissance and the emergence of the North Beach gay scene during the 50s and 60s, will be indispensable reading for students of American literature and gay studies.

The first biography of poet Jack Spicer (1925-1965), a key figure in San Francisco’s gay cultural scene and in the development of American avant garde poetries.

Jack Spicer, unlike his contemporaries Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, and Gary Snyder, was a poet who disdained publishing and relished his role as a social outcast. He died in 1965 virtually unrecognized, yet in the following years his work and thought have attracted and intrigued an international audience. Now this comprehensive biography gives a pivotal poet his due. Based on interviews with scores of Spicer's contemporaries, Poet Be Like God details the most intimate aspects of Spicer's life—his family, his friends, his lovers—illuminating not only the man but also many of his poems.

Such illumination extends also to the works of others whom Spicer came to know, including the writers Frank O'Hara, Robert Duncan, Denise Levertov, Helen Adam, Robin Blaser, Charles Olson, Philip K. Dick, Richard Brautigan, and Marianne Moore and the painters Jess, Fran Herndon, and Jay DeFeo. The resulting narrative, an engaging chronicle of the San Francisco Renaissance and the emergence of the North Beach gay scene during the 50s and 60s, will be indispensable reading for students of American literature and gay studies.

Musical kinships are formed over time, not overnight. Artists benefit the most from slowing developing a rapport with one another, and working toward finding a natural creative middle ground; not abruptly throwing together a full-length project in the span of a few months. It’s very similar to how Marvel has handled the Avenger films vis-à-vis DC’s Justice League. One was built gradually, within a universe that allowed the characters to grow and crossover, whereas the other went full sprint toward a blockbuster climax that has, so far, failed to create any magic or connection between its heroes.

The anticipation for Huncho Jack has been high since the project was first announced last December, and consistent promotional “coming soon” tweets kept the feverish demand high. As the last scheduled collaborative album of the year, Huncho Jack, Jack Huncho could break a streak of rather lackluster duo performances. I'd like to imagine I just wrote that into existance.

The album art by Ralph Steadman is a wonderful first impression. If the music is as impressive as the cover than  Huncho Jack, Jack Huncho will be a treat.

 
 
 
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