Her Body and Other Parties | Graywolf Press

"What's worse, writing a trope or being one?" the narrator of Carmen Maria Machado's story "The Resident," asks. She is at an artists' colony, and one of the other residents — a "poet-composer" named Lydia — has snidely announced that the narrator's autobiographical writing plays into the madwoman in the attic stereotype, not to mention the crazy lesbian stereotype. "It's sort of tiresome and regressive and, well, done, " says Lydia.

Later, the narrator, whose initials are also CM, carves the words "Madwoman in her own attic" into the wood of her writing cabin.

Her Body and Other Parties — just announced as a finalist for the National Book Award — is an abrupt, original, and wild collection of stories, full of outlandish myths that somehow catch at familiar, unspoken truths about being women in the world that more straightforward or realist writing wouldn't. Machado's stories feature a woman who can hear the thoughts of actors in porn videos, a list of sexual partners that slowly resolves into a story about a national epidemic destroying the country, a woman who realizes ghost women are sewn into the seams of dresses at the boutique where she works, and a woman who had a gastric bypass and is haunted by the parts she shed.

Hello. This is a little corner of the internet dedicated to reviewing books and the occasional rambling on movies and television I’m passionate about. Hope you enjoy!

P.S. The title of my blog was inspired by  The Club of Odd Volumes  in which the word odd implied, and I quote, “an eighteenth-century usage meaning varied or unmatched.”

These eight short stories revolve around women, and the violence visited upon women's bodies. The first, "The Husband Stitch," (finalist for the Nebula and Shirley Jackson awards), is a total knockout. The collection is sexy and dark, with elements of fable, horror, comedy, and science fiction. Very queer. Really, it's all those things and it feels as timely as ever. [Tanya]

Finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction

" These stories] vibrate with originality, queerness, sensuality and the strange."--Roxane Gay

"In these formally brilliant and emotionally charged tales, Machado gives literal shape to women's memories and hunger and desire. I couldn't put it down."--Karen Russell

This is FRESH AIR. Our critic-at-large John Powers has a review of a new book he says wowed him right from the start. It's called "Her Body And Other Parties." It's the first collection of short stories by Carmen Maria Machado. The book was recently named one of the five finalists for the National Book Award in fiction.

JOHN POWERS, BYLINE: Whenever I open a new work of fiction, I'm not looking for the stuff that we critics talk about - you know, a dazzling prose style or a big, important theme. What I want most is to be grabbed by a fresh and compelling way of seeing the world, to encounter a voice that makes me think, I can't wait to spend my day with this person.

That happened to me with "Her Body And Other Parties," a first collection of stories by Carmen Maria Machado, an extraordinary young writer about whom I know very little. I know she's 31. I know she lives with her wife in Philadelphia, and I know she's a true original, cross-pollinating fairy tales, horror movies, TV shows and a terrific sense of humor.

This impressive debut collection features tightly wrapped tales that combine a sense of the everyday and otherworldly dread.

It’s a scenario aspiring authors can only dream about: Your first book is finally due for publication, the buzz is building, people in the know discuss it a bit breathlessly and say things like “hotly anticipated,” and then, the unimaginable happens. The book, your book, is longlisted for the National Book Award — before it’s even released.

Machado’s short stories have appeared in a host of big-name venues and garnered numerous awards, including a Pushcart Prize Special Mention, which is why folks have been awaiting this first collection. Her work is brazenly unapologetic, or perhaps unapologetically brazen. Her fearlessness, combined with some spellbinding writing, delivers stories that are at once discomfiting and revelatory.

Graywolf Press is a community of authors, editors, readers, and donors who are brought together by a shared love of great books and a belief that diverse voices and opinions need to be represented in the world of letters.

"What's worse, writing a trope or being one?" the narrator of Carmen Maria Machado's story "The Resident," asks. She is at an artists' colony, and one of the other residents — a "poet-composer" named Lydia — has snidely announced that the narrator's autobiographical writing plays into the madwoman in the attic stereotype, not to mention the crazy lesbian stereotype. "It's sort of tiresome and regressive and, well, done, " says Lydia.

Later, the narrator, whose initials are also CM, carves the words "Madwoman in her own attic" into the wood of her writing cabin.

Her Body and Other Parties — just announced as a finalist for the National Book Award — is an abrupt, original, and wild collection of stories, full of outlandish myths that somehow catch at familiar, unspoken truths about being women in the world that more straightforward or realist writing wouldn't. Machado's stories feature a woman who can hear the thoughts of actors in porn videos, a list of sexual partners that slowly resolves into a story about a national epidemic destroying the country, a woman who realizes ghost women are sewn into the seams of dresses at the boutique where she works, and a woman who had a gastric bypass and is haunted by the parts she shed.

Hello. This is a little corner of the internet dedicated to reviewing books and the occasional rambling on movies and television I’m passionate about. Hope you enjoy!

P.S. The title of my blog was inspired by  The Club of Odd Volumes  in which the word odd implied, and I quote, “an eighteenth-century usage meaning varied or unmatched.”

These eight short stories revolve around women, and the violence visited upon women's bodies. The first, "The Husband Stitch," (finalist for the Nebula and Shirley Jackson awards), is a total knockout. The collection is sexy and dark, with elements of fable, horror, comedy, and science fiction. Very queer. Really, it's all those things and it feels as timely as ever. [Tanya]

Finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction

" These stories] vibrate with originality, queerness, sensuality and the strange."--Roxane Gay

"In these formally brilliant and emotionally charged tales, Machado gives literal shape to women's memories and hunger and desire. I couldn't put it down."--Karen Russell

"What's worse, writing a trope or being one?" the narrator of Carmen Maria Machado's story "The Resident," asks. She is at an artists' colony, and one of the other residents — a "poet-composer" named Lydia — has snidely announced that the narrator's autobiographical writing plays into the madwoman in the attic stereotype, not to mention the crazy lesbian stereotype. "It's sort of tiresome and regressive and, well, done, " says Lydia.

Later, the narrator, whose initials are also CM, carves the words "Madwoman in her own attic" into the wood of her writing cabin.

Her Body and Other Parties — just announced as a finalist for the National Book Award — is an abrupt, original, and wild collection of stories, full of outlandish myths that somehow catch at familiar, unspoken truths about being women in the world that more straightforward or realist writing wouldn't. Machado's stories feature a woman who can hear the thoughts of actors in porn videos, a list of sexual partners that slowly resolves into a story about a national epidemic destroying the country, a woman who realizes ghost women are sewn into the seams of dresses at the boutique where she works, and a woman who had a gastric bypass and is haunted by the parts she shed.

"What's worse, writing a trope or being one?" the narrator of Carmen Maria Machado's story "The Resident," asks. She is at an artists' colony, and one of the other residents — a "poet-composer" named Lydia — has snidely announced that the narrator's autobiographical writing plays into the madwoman in the attic stereotype, not to mention the crazy lesbian stereotype. "It's sort of tiresome and regressive and, well, done, " says Lydia.

Later, the narrator, whose initials are also CM, carves the words "Madwoman in her own attic" into the wood of her writing cabin.

Her Body and Other Parties — just announced as a finalist for the National Book Award — is an abrupt, original, and wild collection of stories, full of outlandish myths that somehow catch at familiar, unspoken truths about being women in the world that more straightforward or realist writing wouldn't. Machado's stories feature a woman who can hear the thoughts of actors in porn videos, a list of sexual partners that slowly resolves into a story about a national epidemic destroying the country, a woman who realizes ghost women are sewn into the seams of dresses at the boutique where she works, and a woman who had a gastric bypass and is haunted by the parts she shed.

Hello. This is a little corner of the internet dedicated to reviewing books and the occasional rambling on movies and television I’m passionate about. Hope you enjoy!

P.S. The title of my blog was inspired by  The Club of Odd Volumes  in which the word odd implied, and I quote, “an eighteenth-century usage meaning varied or unmatched.”

These eight short stories revolve around women, and the violence visited upon women's bodies. The first, "The Husband Stitch," (finalist for the Nebula and Shirley Jackson awards), is a total knockout. The collection is sexy and dark, with elements of fable, horror, comedy, and science fiction. Very queer. Really, it's all those things and it feels as timely as ever. [Tanya]

Finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction

" These stories] vibrate with originality, queerness, sensuality and the strange."--Roxane Gay

"In these formally brilliant and emotionally charged tales, Machado gives literal shape to women's memories and hunger and desire. I couldn't put it down."--Karen Russell

This is FRESH AIR. Our critic-at-large John Powers has a review of a new book he says wowed him right from the start. It's called "Her Body And Other Parties." It's the first collection of short stories by Carmen Maria Machado. The book was recently named one of the five finalists for the National Book Award in fiction.

JOHN POWERS, BYLINE: Whenever I open a new work of fiction, I'm not looking for the stuff that we critics talk about - you know, a dazzling prose style or a big, important theme. What I want most is to be grabbed by a fresh and compelling way of seeing the world, to encounter a voice that makes me think, I can't wait to spend my day with this person.

That happened to me with "Her Body And Other Parties," a first collection of stories by Carmen Maria Machado, an extraordinary young writer about whom I know very little. I know she's 31. I know she lives with her wife in Philadelphia, and I know she's a true original, cross-pollinating fairy tales, horror movies, TV shows and a terrific sense of humor.

"What's worse, writing a trope or being one?" the narrator of Carmen Maria Machado's story "The Resident," asks. She is at an artists' colony, and one of the other residents — a "poet-composer" named Lydia — has snidely announced that the narrator's autobiographical writing plays into the madwoman in the attic stereotype, not to mention the crazy lesbian stereotype. "It's sort of tiresome and regressive and, well, done, " says Lydia.

Later, the narrator, whose initials are also CM, carves the words "Madwoman in her own attic" into the wood of her writing cabin.

Her Body and Other Parties — just announced as a finalist for the National Book Award — is an abrupt, original, and wild collection of stories, full of outlandish myths that somehow catch at familiar, unspoken truths about being women in the world that more straightforward or realist writing wouldn't. Machado's stories feature a woman who can hear the thoughts of actors in porn videos, a list of sexual partners that slowly resolves into a story about a national epidemic destroying the country, a woman who realizes ghost women are sewn into the seams of dresses at the boutique where she works, and a woman who had a gastric bypass and is haunted by the parts she shed.

Hello. This is a little corner of the internet dedicated to reviewing books and the occasional rambling on movies and television I’m passionate about. Hope you enjoy!

P.S. The title of my blog was inspired by  The Club of Odd Volumes  in which the word odd implied, and I quote, “an eighteenth-century usage meaning varied or unmatched.”

"What's worse, writing a trope or being one?" the narrator of Carmen Maria Machado's story "The Resident," asks. She is at an artists' colony, and one of the other residents — a "poet-composer" named Lydia — has snidely announced that the narrator's autobiographical writing plays into the madwoman in the attic stereotype, not to mention the crazy lesbian stereotype. "It's sort of tiresome and regressive and, well, done, " says Lydia.

Later, the narrator, whose initials are also CM, carves the words "Madwoman in her own attic" into the wood of her writing cabin.

Her Body and Other Parties — just announced as a finalist for the National Book Award — is an abrupt, original, and wild collection of stories, full of outlandish myths that somehow catch at familiar, unspoken truths about being women in the world that more straightforward or realist writing wouldn't. Machado's stories feature a woman who can hear the thoughts of actors in porn videos, a list of sexual partners that slowly resolves into a story about a national epidemic destroying the country, a woman who realizes ghost women are sewn into the seams of dresses at the boutique where she works, and a woman who had a gastric bypass and is haunted by the parts she shed.

Hello. This is a little corner of the internet dedicated to reviewing books and the occasional rambling on movies and television I’m passionate about. Hope you enjoy!

P.S. The title of my blog was inspired by  The Club of Odd Volumes  in which the word odd implied, and I quote, “an eighteenth-century usage meaning varied or unmatched.”

These eight short stories revolve around women, and the violence visited upon women's bodies. The first, "The Husband Stitch," (finalist for the Nebula and Shirley Jackson awards), is a total knockout. The collection is sexy and dark, with elements of fable, horror, comedy, and science fiction. Very queer. Really, it's all those things and it feels as timely as ever. [Tanya]

Finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction

" These stories] vibrate with originality, queerness, sensuality and the strange."--Roxane Gay

"In these formally brilliant and emotionally charged tales, Machado gives literal shape to women's memories and hunger and desire. I couldn't put it down."--Karen Russell

This is FRESH AIR. Our critic-at-large John Powers has a review of a new book he says wowed him right from the start. It's called "Her Body And Other Parties." It's the first collection of short stories by Carmen Maria Machado. The book was recently named one of the five finalists for the National Book Award in fiction.

JOHN POWERS, BYLINE: Whenever I open a new work of fiction, I'm not looking for the stuff that we critics talk about - you know, a dazzling prose style or a big, important theme. What I want most is to be grabbed by a fresh and compelling way of seeing the world, to encounter a voice that makes me think, I can't wait to spend my day with this person.

That happened to me with "Her Body And Other Parties," a first collection of stories by Carmen Maria Machado, an extraordinary young writer about whom I know very little. I know she's 31. I know she lives with her wife in Philadelphia, and I know she's a true original, cross-pollinating fairy tales, horror movies, TV shows and a terrific sense of humor.

This impressive debut collection features tightly wrapped tales that combine a sense of the everyday and otherworldly dread.

It’s a scenario aspiring authors can only dream about: Your first book is finally due for publication, the buzz is building, people in the know discuss it a bit breathlessly and say things like “hotly anticipated,” and then, the unimaginable happens. The book, your book, is longlisted for the National Book Award — before it’s even released.

Machado’s short stories have appeared in a host of big-name venues and garnered numerous awards, including a Pushcart Prize Special Mention, which is why folks have been awaiting this first collection. Her work is brazenly unapologetic, or perhaps unapologetically brazen. Her fearlessness, combined with some spellbinding writing, delivers stories that are at once discomfiting and revelatory.

 
 
 
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