Kenzo Tange and Arata Isozaki: Two Giants of Japanese.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Format: Hardback
Size: 290 x 250 mm (11 5/8 x 10 1/8 in)
Pages: 288 pp
Illustrations: 0 illustrations
ISBN: 9780714845357

Arata Isozaki is one of the most important living Japanese architects today. After spending nine years working as an apprentice for Kenzo Tange, he went on to establish his own firm, Arata Isozaki Studio, in 1963, and since then has earned a reputation across the globe for his notable buildings in Asia, Europe and America. He was awarded the RIBA gold medal in 1986.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Format: Hardback
Size: 290 x 250 mm (11 5/8 x 10 1/8 in)
Pages: 288 pp
Illustrations: 0 illustrations
ISBN: 9780714845357

Arata Isozaki is one of the most important living Japanese architects today. After spending nine years working as an apprentice for Kenzo Tange, he went on to establish his own firm, Arata Isozaki Studio, in 1963, and since then has earned a reputation across the globe for his notable buildings in Asia, Europe and America. He was awarded the RIBA gold medal in 1986.

“Architects today tend to depreciate themselves, to regard themselves as no more than just ordinary citizens without the power to reform the future.”       - Kenzo Tange

In honor of what would have been Kenzo Tange’s 100th birthday, AD Classics presents one of the Japanese master’s most iconic projects - the Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center. Built in 1967, the building was the first spatial realization of Tange’s Metabolist ideas of organically-inspired structural growth, developed in the late 1950s. The Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center is far more significant than its relatively small size would suggest, encapsulating the concepts of  the new Metabolistic order in architecture and urban planning that prevailed in post-World War II Japan.

Built in the Ginza district of Tokyo , the Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center gave Tange a chance to materialize his Metabolist ideals, which called for a new urban typology that could self perpetuate in an organic, vernacular, "metabolic" manner. The narrow, 189 square-meter, triangular site inspired Tange to design a vertical structure, consisting of a main infrastructural core, which could develop into an urban megastructure (a term coined by a fellow Metabolist, Japanese architect  Fumihiko Maki ), into which an ever-growing number of prefabricated capsules could be “plugged-in.”

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SPECIFICATIONS:

Format: Hardback
Size: 290 x 250 mm (11 5/8 x 10 1/8 in)
Pages: 288 pp
Illustrations: 0 illustrations
ISBN: 9780714845357

Arata Isozaki is one of the most important living Japanese architects today. After spending nine years working as an apprentice for Kenzo Tange, he went on to establish his own firm, Arata Isozaki Studio, in 1963, and since then has earned a reputation across the globe for his notable buildings in Asia, Europe and America. He was awarded the RIBA gold medal in 1986.

“Architects today tend to depreciate themselves, to regard themselves as no more than just ordinary citizens without the power to reform the future.”       - Kenzo Tange

In honor of what would have been Kenzo Tange’s 100th birthday, AD Classics presents one of the Japanese master’s most iconic projects - the Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center. Built in 1967, the building was the first spatial realization of Tange’s Metabolist ideas of organically-inspired structural growth, developed in the late 1950s. The Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center is far more significant than its relatively small size would suggest, encapsulating the concepts of  the new Metabolistic order in architecture and urban planning that prevailed in post-World War II Japan.

Built in the Ginza district of Tokyo , the Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center gave Tange a chance to materialize his Metabolist ideals, which called for a new urban typology that could self perpetuate in an organic, vernacular, "metabolic" manner. The narrow, 189 square-meter, triangular site inspired Tange to design a vertical structure, consisting of a main infrastructural core, which could develop into an urban megastructure (a term coined by a fellow Metabolist, Japanese architect  Fumihiko Maki ), into which an ever-growing number of prefabricated capsules could be “plugged-in.”

 
 
 
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