Roman Carlisle – The Chronicles of Roman

This year’s collection of cookbooks proves that great food writing can be — and should be — about so much more than food.

It’s about diving deep to learn more about a country and its people. It’s about finding ways to make cooking a little easier, and fun, in our increasingly busy times. It can offer a glimpse into the creativity that drives a cult-status restaurant. Or it can celebrate badass women who rule the kitchen and aren’t afraid to be themselves. It’s about sharing deeply personal stories of finding a better understanding of one’s cultural identity. It can even serve as a call to action to engage in helping to make our country a truly better place. These are our favorite cookbooks of 2017.

BraveTart. With her first cookbook, Serious Eats pastry wizard Stella Parks wants to inspire home cooks to “bake like crazy.” More than recipes, Parks offers thoughtfully researched and detailed histories of each of her riffs on homey American sweets, like the evolution of the pineapple-upside-down cake and the true origins of chocolate chip cookies. Trouble-shooting tips and dives into the science behind baking encourage even more creativity in the kitchen. Look for her “Mix it up!” suggestions to recipes, such as adding coconut and white chocolate to her honey-roasted peanut butter cookies.

For 25 years, the BBC's archaeology series took viewers around the world to explore historical excavations and discover long-gone cultures and civilisations.

With a mix of live broadcasts and filmed documentaries, 'Chronicle' brought some of the greatest archaeologists of the 20th Century into our homes. In this collection, we look back at a selection of programmes from the series.

You're using the Internet Explorer 6 browser to view the BBC website. Our site will work much better if you change to a more modern browser. It's free, quick and easy. Find out more about upgrading your browser here…

The Chronicle of Fredegar is the conventional title used for a 7th-century Frankish chronicle that was probably written in Burgundy . The author is unknown and the attribution to Fredegar dates only from the 16th century.

The chronicle begins with the creation of the world and ends in AD 642. There are also a few references to events up to 658. Some copies of the manuscript contain an abridged version of the chronicle up to the date of 642, but include additional sections written under the Carolingian dynasty that end with the death of Pepin the Short in 768. The Chronicle of Fredegar with its Continuations is one of the few sources that provide information on the Merovingian dynasty for the period after 591 when Gregory of Tours ' the Decem Libri Historiarum finishes.

None of the surviving manuscripts specify the name of the author. [2] The name "Fredegar" (modern French Frédégaire) was first used for the chronicle in 1579 by Claude Fauchet in his Recueil des antiquitez gauloises et françoises . [3] [4] The question of who wrote this work has been much debated, although the historian J. M. Wallace-Hadrill admits that "Fredegar" is a genuine, if unusual, Frankish name. [5] The Vulgar Latin of this work confirms that the Chronicle was written in Gaul; beyond this, little is certain about the origin of this work. As a result, there are several theories about the authorship: [6]

This year’s collection of cookbooks proves that great food writing can be — and should be — about so much more than food.

It’s about diving deep to learn more about a country and its people. It’s about finding ways to make cooking a little easier, and fun, in our increasingly busy times. It can offer a glimpse into the creativity that drives a cult-status restaurant. Or it can celebrate badass women who rule the kitchen and aren’t afraid to be themselves. It’s about sharing deeply personal stories of finding a better understanding of one’s cultural identity. It can even serve as a call to action to engage in helping to make our country a truly better place. These are our favorite cookbooks of 2017.

BraveTart. With her first cookbook, Serious Eats pastry wizard Stella Parks wants to inspire home cooks to “bake like crazy.” More than recipes, Parks offers thoughtfully researched and detailed histories of each of her riffs on homey American sweets, like the evolution of the pineapple-upside-down cake and the true origins of chocolate chip cookies. Trouble-shooting tips and dives into the science behind baking encourage even more creativity in the kitchen. Look for her “Mix it up!” suggestions to recipes, such as adding coconut and white chocolate to her honey-roasted peanut butter cookies.

This year’s collection of cookbooks proves that great food writing can be — and should be — about so much more than food.

It’s about diving deep to learn more about a country and its people. It’s about finding ways to make cooking a little easier, and fun, in our increasingly busy times. It can offer a glimpse into the creativity that drives a cult-status restaurant. Or it can celebrate badass women who rule the kitchen and aren’t afraid to be themselves. It’s about sharing deeply personal stories of finding a better understanding of one’s cultural identity. It can even serve as a call to action to engage in helping to make our country a truly better place. These are our favorite cookbooks of 2017.

BraveTart. With her first cookbook, Serious Eats pastry wizard Stella Parks wants to inspire home cooks to “bake like crazy.” More than recipes, Parks offers thoughtfully researched and detailed histories of each of her riffs on homey American sweets, like the evolution of the pineapple-upside-down cake and the true origins of chocolate chip cookies. Trouble-shooting tips and dives into the science behind baking encourage even more creativity in the kitchen. Look for her “Mix it up!” suggestions to recipes, such as adding coconut and white chocolate to her honey-roasted peanut butter cookies.

For 25 years, the BBC's archaeology series took viewers around the world to explore historical excavations and discover long-gone cultures and civilisations.

With a mix of live broadcasts and filmed documentaries, 'Chronicle' brought some of the greatest archaeologists of the 20th Century into our homes. In this collection, we look back at a selection of programmes from the series.

You're using the Internet Explorer 6 browser to view the BBC website. Our site will work much better if you change to a more modern browser. It's free, quick and easy. Find out more about upgrading your browser here…

This year’s collection of cookbooks proves that great food writing can be — and should be — about so much more than food.

It’s about diving deep to learn more about a country and its people. It’s about finding ways to make cooking a little easier, and fun, in our increasingly busy times. It can offer a glimpse into the creativity that drives a cult-status restaurant. Or it can celebrate badass women who rule the kitchen and aren’t afraid to be themselves. It’s about sharing deeply personal stories of finding a better understanding of one’s cultural identity. It can even serve as a call to action to engage in helping to make our country a truly better place. These are our favorite cookbooks of 2017.

BraveTart. With her first cookbook, Serious Eats pastry wizard Stella Parks wants to inspire home cooks to “bake like crazy.” More than recipes, Parks offers thoughtfully researched and detailed histories of each of her riffs on homey American sweets, like the evolution of the pineapple-upside-down cake and the true origins of chocolate chip cookies. Trouble-shooting tips and dives into the science behind baking encourage even more creativity in the kitchen. Look for her “Mix it up!” suggestions to recipes, such as adding coconut and white chocolate to her honey-roasted peanut butter cookies.

For 25 years, the BBC's archaeology series took viewers around the world to explore historical excavations and discover long-gone cultures and civilisations.

With a mix of live broadcasts and filmed documentaries, 'Chronicle' brought some of the greatest archaeologists of the 20th Century into our homes. In this collection, we look back at a selection of programmes from the series.

You're using the Internet Explorer 6 browser to view the BBC website. Our site will work much better if you change to a more modern browser. It's free, quick and easy. Find out more about upgrading your browser here…

The Chronicle of Fredegar is the conventional title used for a 7th-century Frankish chronicle that was probably written in Burgundy . The author is unknown and the attribution to Fredegar dates only from the 16th century.

The chronicle begins with the creation of the world and ends in AD 642. There are also a few references to events up to 658. Some copies of the manuscript contain an abridged version of the chronicle up to the date of 642, but include additional sections written under the Carolingian dynasty that end with the death of Pepin the Short in 768. The Chronicle of Fredegar with its Continuations is one of the few sources that provide information on the Merovingian dynasty for the period after 591 when Gregory of Tours ' the Decem Libri Historiarum finishes.

None of the surviving manuscripts specify the name of the author. [2] The name "Fredegar" (modern French Frédégaire) was first used for the chronicle in 1579 by Claude Fauchet in his Recueil des antiquitez gauloises et françoises . [3] [4] The question of who wrote this work has been much debated, although the historian J. M. Wallace-Hadrill admits that "Fredegar" is a genuine, if unusual, Frankish name. [5] The Vulgar Latin of this work confirms that the Chronicle was written in Gaul; beyond this, little is certain about the origin of this work. As a result, there are several theories about the authorship: [6]

Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Something we hope you'll especially enjoy: FBA items qualify for FREE Shipping and Amazon Prime.

If you're a seller, Fulfillment by Amazon can help you increase your sales. We invite you to learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon .

This is the first book to focus on the succession of rulers of imperial Rome, using timelines and other visual aids throughout. Now no one need be in any doubt as to who built the Colosseum or when Rome was sacked by the Goths: Chronicle of the Roman Emperors provides the answers quickly and authoritatively.

The Holt Chronicle, located in Holt, North Norfolk is a popular free community magazine that is published fortnightly and distributed FREE throughout Holt, Fakenham, Sheringham and Wells and to more than 30 surrounding towns and villages.

Almost 6000 copies are printed of each issue and features local news, readers’ letters, forthcoming events, news from the local sport scene, advertising and much more.

It also features regular reports from many clubs, societies and organisations in the area, including the Town and District Councils, local schools and Police. It strives to be both an informative and interesting magazine that keeps the community aware of what is happening where they live, whilst providing a ‘good read’ with something for everyone.

This year’s collection of cookbooks proves that great food writing can be — and should be — about so much more than food.

It’s about diving deep to learn more about a country and its people. It’s about finding ways to make cooking a little easier, and fun, in our increasingly busy times. It can offer a glimpse into the creativity that drives a cult-status restaurant. Or it can celebrate badass women who rule the kitchen and aren’t afraid to be themselves. It’s about sharing deeply personal stories of finding a better understanding of one’s cultural identity. It can even serve as a call to action to engage in helping to make our country a truly better place. These are our favorite cookbooks of 2017.

BraveTart. With her first cookbook, Serious Eats pastry wizard Stella Parks wants to inspire home cooks to “bake like crazy.” More than recipes, Parks offers thoughtfully researched and detailed histories of each of her riffs on homey American sweets, like the evolution of the pineapple-upside-down cake and the true origins of chocolate chip cookies. Trouble-shooting tips and dives into the science behind baking encourage even more creativity in the kitchen. Look for her “Mix it up!” suggestions to recipes, such as adding coconut and white chocolate to her honey-roasted peanut butter cookies.

For 25 years, the BBC's archaeology series took viewers around the world to explore historical excavations and discover long-gone cultures and civilisations.

With a mix of live broadcasts and filmed documentaries, 'Chronicle' brought some of the greatest archaeologists of the 20th Century into our homes. In this collection, we look back at a selection of programmes from the series.

You're using the Internet Explorer 6 browser to view the BBC website. Our site will work much better if you change to a more modern browser. It's free, quick and easy. Find out more about upgrading your browser here…

The Chronicle of Fredegar is the conventional title used for a 7th-century Frankish chronicle that was probably written in Burgundy . The author is unknown and the attribution to Fredegar dates only from the 16th century.

The chronicle begins with the creation of the world and ends in AD 642. There are also a few references to events up to 658. Some copies of the manuscript contain an abridged version of the chronicle up to the date of 642, but include additional sections written under the Carolingian dynasty that end with the death of Pepin the Short in 768. The Chronicle of Fredegar with its Continuations is one of the few sources that provide information on the Merovingian dynasty for the period after 591 when Gregory of Tours ' the Decem Libri Historiarum finishes.

None of the surviving manuscripts specify the name of the author. [2] The name "Fredegar" (modern French Frédégaire) was first used for the chronicle in 1579 by Claude Fauchet in his Recueil des antiquitez gauloises et françoises . [3] [4] The question of who wrote this work has been much debated, although the historian J. M. Wallace-Hadrill admits that "Fredegar" is a genuine, if unusual, Frankish name. [5] The Vulgar Latin of this work confirms that the Chronicle was written in Gaul; beyond this, little is certain about the origin of this work. As a result, there are several theories about the authorship: [6]

Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Something we hope you'll especially enjoy: FBA items qualify for FREE Shipping and Amazon Prime.

If you're a seller, Fulfillment by Amazon can help you increase your sales. We invite you to learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon .

This is the first book to focus on the succession of rulers of imperial Rome, using timelines and other visual aids throughout. Now no one need be in any doubt as to who built the Colosseum or when Rome was sacked by the Goths: Chronicle of the Roman Emperors provides the answers quickly and authoritatively.

 
 
 
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