Why Bernie Sanders Doesn’t Want Your Vote - Bloomberg.com

But as an adult, Sanders drifted away from Jewish customs. And as his bid for the White House gains momentum, he has the chance to make history. Not just as the first Jewish president — but as one of the few modern presidents to present himself as not religious.

“I think everyone believes in God in their own ways,” he said. “To me, it means that all of us are connected, all of life is connected, and that we are all tied together.”

Sanders’s religious views, which he has rarely discussed, set him apart from the norm in modern American politics, in which voters have come to expect candidates from both parties to hold traditional views about God and to speak about their faith journeys.

But as an adult, Sanders drifted away from Jewish customs. And as his bid for the White House gains momentum, he has the chance to make history. Not just as the first Jewish president — but as one of the few modern presidents to present himself as not religious.

“I think everyone believes in God in their own ways,” he said. “To me, it means that all of us are connected, all of life is connected, and that we are all tied together.”

Sanders’s religious views, which he has rarely discussed, set him apart from the norm in modern American politics, in which voters have come to expect candidates from both parties to hold traditional views about God and to speak about their faith journeys.

The notoriously apathetic 18-to-29 demographic is mobilising for the leftwing candidate in typical youth fashion: social media and Brooklyn loft parties

“It’s a four-year-old workout shirt,” says Nick Kowalczyk, holding up a once-white cotton T-shirt that now has a lot of yellowing under the arms.

Kowalcyzk, 29, is an actor originally from Atlanta. His friend asks if he plans to wear his cowboy hat with the freshly printed shirt, which now has a red heart with a cutout face in the middle which vaguely resembles an outline of the head of the Vermont senator and leftwing candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. Above the heart: “Bernie.” Below it: “For President.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders didn’t want to run for president. Or least he says he didn’t. But after months of waiting for a better candidate to step up and challenge Hillary Clinton from the left, Sanders believes the responsibility fell to him.  

A white, 73-year-old self-described socialist is not exactly an ideal candidate for the Democratic nomination in 2016 – in no small part because he’s still not even a Democrat.

But if the saying is true, Sanders has a distinct advantage – he showed up. And in a year when few are willing to challenge Clinton, that could be enough to make Sanders an important force in determining the future of the Democratic Party, even if he has almost no chance of winning.  

But as an adult, Sanders drifted away from Jewish customs. And as his bid for the White House gains momentum, he has the chance to make history. Not just as the first Jewish president — but as one of the few modern presidents to present himself as not religious.

“I think everyone believes in God in their own ways,” he said. “To me, it means that all of us are connected, all of life is connected, and that we are all tied together.”

Sanders’s religious views, which he has rarely discussed, set him apart from the norm in modern American politics, in which voters have come to expect candidates from both parties to hold traditional views about God and to speak about their faith journeys.

The notoriously apathetic 18-to-29 demographic is mobilising for the leftwing candidate in typical youth fashion: social media and Brooklyn loft parties

“It’s a four-year-old workout shirt,” says Nick Kowalczyk, holding up a once-white cotton T-shirt that now has a lot of yellowing under the arms.

Kowalcyzk, 29, is an actor originally from Atlanta. His friend asks if he plans to wear his cowboy hat with the freshly printed shirt, which now has a red heart with a cutout face in the middle which vaguely resembles an outline of the head of the Vermont senator and leftwing candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. Above the heart: “Bernie.” Below it: “For President.”

But as an adult, Sanders drifted away from Jewish customs. And as his bid for the White House gains momentum, he has the chance to make history. Not just as the first Jewish president — but as one of the few modern presidents to present himself as not religious.

“I think everyone believes in God in their own ways,” he said. “To me, it means that all of us are connected, all of life is connected, and that we are all tied together.”

Sanders’s religious views, which he has rarely discussed, set him apart from the norm in modern American politics, in which voters have come to expect candidates from both parties to hold traditional views about God and to speak about their faith journeys.

The notoriously apathetic 18-to-29 demographic is mobilising for the leftwing candidate in typical youth fashion: social media and Brooklyn loft parties

“It’s a four-year-old workout shirt,” says Nick Kowalczyk, holding up a once-white cotton T-shirt that now has a lot of yellowing under the arms.

Kowalcyzk, 29, is an actor originally from Atlanta. His friend asks if he plans to wear his cowboy hat with the freshly printed shirt, which now has a red heart with a cutout face in the middle which vaguely resembles an outline of the head of the Vermont senator and leftwing candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. Above the heart: “Bernie.” Below it: “For President.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders didn’t want to run for president. Or least he says he didn’t. But after months of waiting for a better candidate to step up and challenge Hillary Clinton from the left, Sanders believes the responsibility fell to him.  

A white, 73-year-old self-described socialist is not exactly an ideal candidate for the Democratic nomination in 2016 – in no small part because he’s still not even a Democrat.

But if the saying is true, Sanders has a distinct advantage – he showed up. And in a year when few are willing to challenge Clinton, that could be enough to make Sanders an important force in determining the future of the Democratic Party, even if he has almost no chance of winning.  

“That man is like superhuman,” Joy Manbeck told The New York Times at the annual People’s Summit in Chicago earlier this month. “He still plays basketball. He walks to work. I don’t care. I want him. Period. I want Bernie.” So does RoseAnn DeMoro, the indefatigable leader of the National Nurses United union. In an interview with McClatchy, she said the Vermont senator is “so clearly ahead” of other potential contenders in the nascent 2020 Democratic presidential field. She added, “He has the most comprehensive program. He’s been doing this his whole life. What people want is what Bernie is saying.”

She has a point. An April Harvard-Harris survey revealed that Sanders is the most popular politician in the country: 80 percent of registered Democrats and 57 percent of voters overall say they approve of him. During the 2016 primary, Sanders won key states that Hillary Clinton later lost to Donald Trump; her defeat was at least partly attributable to an “enthusiasm gap” among expected Democratic voters. Sanders himself has not indicated that he’s planning another White House run, but thanks to his popularity and the unexpected viability of his primary campaign, questions about his political future are being asked.

But all this speculation does prompt another, equally important, question: Should Sanders run? The answer is no, though not for the reasons his critics think.

 
 
 
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