In Mistakes I Made At Work, Women At The Top. - Forbes

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In Mistakes I Made at Work , a Publishers Weekly Top 10 Business Book for Spring 2014, Jessica Bacal interviews twenty-five successful women about their toughest on-the-job moments. These innovators across a variety of fields—from the arts to finance to tech—reveal that they’re more thoughtful, purposeful, and assertive as leaders because they learned from their mistakes, not because they never made any. Interviewees include:

Ideal for millennials just starting their careers, for women seeking to advance at work, or for anyone grappling with issues of perfectionism, Mistakes I Made at Work features fascinating and surprising anecdotes, as well as tips for listeners.

A Tennessee Bureau of Investigation special agent testified that mistakes were made by the agency after the disappearance of Holly Bobo in April 2011.

Brent Booth, the agent assigned to the 24th Judicial District that includes Decatur County, said the agency had too much information coming in too fast and never checked the alibis of Zach Adams, Dylan Adams, Jason Autry or Shayne Austin in the days after the disappearance.

“It was a mistake not to check suspects’ alibis,” Booth testified. He said the agency was focused on Terry Britt.

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.
You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website.

In Mistakes I Made at Work , a Publishers Weekly Top 10 Business Book for Spring 2014, Jessica Bacal interviews twenty-five successful women about their toughest on-the-job moments. These innovators across a variety of fields—from the arts to finance to tech—reveal that they’re more thoughtful, purposeful, and assertive as leaders because they learned from their mistakes, not because they never made any. Interviewees include:

Ideal for millennials just starting their careers, for women seeking to advance at work, or for anyone grappling with issues of perfectionism, Mistakes I Made at Work features fascinating and surprising anecdotes, as well as tips for listeners.

A Tennessee Bureau of Investigation special agent testified that mistakes were made by the agency after the disappearance of Holly Bobo in April 2011.

Brent Booth, the agent assigned to the 24th Judicial District that includes Decatur County, said the agency had too much information coming in too fast and never checked the alibis of Zach Adams, Dylan Adams, Jason Autry or Shayne Austin in the days after the disappearance.

“It was a mistake not to check suspects’ alibis,” Booth testified. He said the agency was focused on Terry Britt.

The WannaCry ransomware attack has quickly become the worst digital disaster to strike the internet in years, crippling transportation and hospitals globally. But it increasingly appears that this is not the work of hacker masterminds. Instead, cybersecurity investigators see in the recent meltdown a sloppy cybercriminal scheme, one that reveals amateur mistakes at practically every turn.

As the unprecedented ransomware attack known as WannaCry (or Wcrypt) unfolds, the cybersecurity community has marveled at the inexplicable errors the malware's authors have made. Despite the giant footprint of the attack, which leveraged a leaked NSA-created Windows hacking technique to infect more than 200,000 systems across 150 countries, malware analysts say poor choices on the part of WannaCry's creators have limited both its scope and profit.

Those errors include building in a web-based "kill-switch" that cut short its spread, unsavvy handling of bitcoin payments that makes it far easier to track the hacker group's profits, and even a shoddy ransom function in the malware itself. Some analysts say the system makes it impossible for the criminals to know who's paid the ransom and who hasn't.

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.
You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website.

In Mistakes I Made at Work , a Publishers Weekly Top 10 Business Book for Spring 2014, Jessica Bacal interviews twenty-five successful women about their toughest on-the-job moments. These innovators across a variety of fields—from the arts to finance to tech—reveal that they’re more thoughtful, purposeful, and assertive as leaders because they learned from their mistakes, not because they never made any. Interviewees include:

Ideal for millennials just starting their careers, for women seeking to advance at work, or for anyone grappling with issues of perfectionism, Mistakes I Made at Work features fascinating and surprising anecdotes, as well as tips for listeners.

 
 
 
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