The little engine that could. / Based on the story by the.

It was 1967 and the world looked very different than today. The Vietnam War was raging. O.J. Simpson was having a stellar year as a running back at USC. Elvis Presley married Priscilla in Las Vegas. The world’s first human heart transplant was performed.

And in our own backyard, IAM Local Lodge 2297 in North Carolina was chartered, never realizing that it too would make the history books. That’s what brought IAM’s Southern Territory General Vice President Mark A. Blondin to this part of the country to help mark this momentous occasion.

“It was an honor to be a part of celebrating this milestone in Local Lodge 2297’s history. And we did that in a very Machinist way,” said Blondin. “During the day, I met members on the shop floor at Spirit AeroSystems in Kinston to find out what’s working and what’s not. The evening gave me some one-on-one opportunities with Machinists from all walks of life to listen and learn about working issues in North Carolina. I’m very impressed that in a Right to Work state, 2297 continues to out-organize other larger locals and has been very successful in bringing in federal sector workers to the IAM. Today is what I call the perfect Machinists Memorial to a Lodge that deserves the credit.”

It was 1967 and the world looked very different than today. The Vietnam War was raging. O.J. Simpson was having a stellar year as a running back at USC. Elvis Presley married Priscilla in Las Vegas. The world’s first human heart transplant was performed.

And in our own backyard, IAM Local Lodge 2297 in North Carolina was chartered, never realizing that it too would make the history books. That’s what brought IAM’s Southern Territory General Vice President Mark A. Blondin to this part of the country to help mark this momentous occasion.

“It was an honor to be a part of celebrating this milestone in Local Lodge 2297’s history. And we did that in a very Machinist way,” said Blondin. “During the day, I met members on the shop floor at Spirit AeroSystems in Kinston to find out what’s working and what’s not. The evening gave me some one-on-one opportunities with Machinists from all walks of life to listen and learn about working issues in North Carolina. I’m very impressed that in a Right to Work state, 2297 continues to out-organize other larger locals and has been very successful in bringing in federal sector workers to the IAM. Today is what I call the perfect Machinists Memorial to a Lodge that deserves the credit.”

The Little Engine That Could is an illustrated children's book that became widely known in the United States after publication in 1930 by Platt & Munk . The story is used to teach children the value of optimism and hard work. Based on a 2007 online poll, the National Education Association named the book one of its "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children". [1]

The story's signature phrases such as "I think I can" first occurred in print in a 1902 article in a Swedish journal. [2] An early published version of the story, " Story of the Engine That Thought It Could ", appeared in the New-York Tribune on April 8, 1906, as part of a sermon by the Rev. Charles S. Wing. [2]

A brief version of the tale appeared under the title Thinking One Can in 1906, in Wellspring for Young People , a Sunday school publication. [2] This version reappeared in a 1910 book, Foundation Stones of Success . [2]

It was 1967 and the world looked very different than today. The Vietnam War was raging. O.J. Simpson was having a stellar year as a running back at USC. Elvis Presley married Priscilla in Las Vegas. The world’s first human heart transplant was performed.

And in our own backyard, IAM Local Lodge 2297 in North Carolina was chartered, never realizing that it too would make the history books. That’s what brought IAM’s Southern Territory General Vice President Mark A. Blondin to this part of the country to help mark this momentous occasion.

“It was an honor to be a part of celebrating this milestone in Local Lodge 2297’s history. And we did that in a very Machinist way,” said Blondin. “During the day, I met members on the shop floor at Spirit AeroSystems in Kinston to find out what’s working and what’s not. The evening gave me some one-on-one opportunities with Machinists from all walks of life to listen and learn about working issues in North Carolina. I’m very impressed that in a Right to Work state, 2297 continues to out-organize other larger locals and has been very successful in bringing in federal sector workers to the IAM. Today is what I call the perfect Machinists Memorial to a Lodge that deserves the credit.”

The Little Engine That Could is an illustrated children's book that became widely known in the United States after publication in 1930 by Platt & Munk . The story is used to teach children the value of optimism and hard work. Based on a 2007 online poll, the National Education Association named the book one of its "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children". [1]

The story's signature phrases such as "I think I can" first occurred in print in a 1902 article in a Swedish journal. [2] An early published version of the story, " Story of the Engine That Thought It Could ", appeared in the New-York Tribune on April 8, 1906, as part of a sermon by the Rev. Charles S. Wing. [2]

A brief version of the tale appeared under the title Thinking One Can in 1906, in Wellspring for Young People , a Sunday school publication. [2] This version reappeared in a 1910 book, Foundation Stones of Success . [2]

In a certain railroad yard there stood an extremely heavy train that had to be drawn up an 
unusually heavy grade before it could reach its
 destination. The superintendent of the yard was 
not sure what it was best for him to do, so he
 went up to a large, strong engine and asked:
 "Can you pull that train over the hill?"


The superintendent was much puzzled, but he 
turned to still another engine that was spick
 and span new, and he asked it:
 "Can you pull that train over the hill?"


So the order was circulated, and the engine
 was started back so that it might be coupled
 with the train, and as it went along the rails it
 kept repeating to itself: "I think I can. I think
 I can. I think I can."


It was 1967 and the world looked very different than today. The Vietnam War was raging. O.J. Simpson was having a stellar year as a running back at USC. Elvis Presley married Priscilla in Las Vegas. The world’s first human heart transplant was performed.

And in our own backyard, IAM Local Lodge 2297 in North Carolina was chartered, never realizing that it too would make the history books. That’s what brought IAM’s Southern Territory General Vice President Mark A. Blondin to this part of the country to help mark this momentous occasion.

“It was an honor to be a part of celebrating this milestone in Local Lodge 2297’s history. And we did that in a very Machinist way,” said Blondin. “During the day, I met members on the shop floor at Spirit AeroSystems in Kinston to find out what’s working and what’s not. The evening gave me some one-on-one opportunities with Machinists from all walks of life to listen and learn about working issues in North Carolina. I’m very impressed that in a Right to Work state, 2297 continues to out-organize other larger locals and has been very successful in bringing in federal sector workers to the IAM. Today is what I call the perfect Machinists Memorial to a Lodge that deserves the credit.”

The Little Engine That Could is an illustrated children's book that became widely known in the United States after publication in 1930 by Platt & Munk . The story is used to teach children the value of optimism and hard work. Based on a 2007 online poll, the National Education Association named the book one of its "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children". [1]

The story's signature phrases such as "I think I can" first occurred in print in a 1902 article in a Swedish journal. [2] An early published version of the story, " Story of the Engine That Thought It Could ", appeared in the New-York Tribune on April 8, 1906, as part of a sermon by the Rev. Charles S. Wing. [2]

A brief version of the tale appeared under the title Thinking One Can in 1906, in Wellspring for Young People , a Sunday school publication. [2] This version reappeared in a 1910 book, Foundation Stones of Success . [2]

In a certain railroad yard there stood an extremely heavy train that had to be drawn up an 
unusually heavy grade before it could reach its
 destination. The superintendent of the yard was 
not sure what it was best for him to do, so he
 went up to a large, strong engine and asked:
 "Can you pull that train over the hill?"


The superintendent was much puzzled, but he 
turned to still another engine that was spick
 and span new, and he asked it:
 "Can you pull that train over the hill?"


So the order was circulated, and the engine
 was started back so that it might be coupled
 with the train, and as it went along the rails it
 kept repeating to itself: "I think I can. I think
 I can. I think I can."


Though the book wasn't necessarily designed for this purpose, the pictures in Watty Piper's classic story The Little Engine That Could are so lucious and compelling, and so packed with recognizable objects, the book makes a wonderful tool for working with young kids on recognition of foods, colors, and objects. Kids also find it fun to count how many apples, oranges, lollipops, etc.

The Little Engine That Could may be the classic inspirational tale for young children. The Little Engine's sunny mantra, "I think I can, I think I can," says you can do it if you try.

As a childlike engine that succeeds by trying his best, the Little Engine sets a great example for kids with his positive attitude, generosity, and strong effort.

 
 
 
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