3D computer graphics - Wikipedia

3D computer graphics or three-dimensional computer graphics, (in contrast to 2D computer graphics ) are graphics that use a three-dimensional representation of geometric data (often Cartesian ) that is stored in the computer for the purposes of performing calculations and rendering 2D images . Such images may be stored for viewing later or displayed in real-time .

3D computer graphics rely on many of the same algorithms as 2D computer vector graphics in the wire-frame model and 2D computer raster graphics in the final rendered display. In computer graphics software, the distinction between 2D and 3D is occasionally blurred; 2D applications may use 3D techniques to achieve effects such as lighting , and 3D may use 2D rendering techniques.

3D computer graphics are often referred to as 3D models . Apart from the rendered graphic, the model is contained within the graphical data file. However, there are differences: a 3D model is the mathematical representation of any three-dimensional object. A model is not technically a graphic until it is displayed. A model can be displayed visually as a two-dimensional image through a process called 3D rendering or used in non-graphical computer simulations and calculations. With 3D printing , 3D models are similarly rendered into a 3D physical representation of the model, with limitations to how accurate the rendering can match the virtual model.

It has been a while since our last installment in this series on 3D graphics programming in Java (more on that at the end of this column). Here's a quick refresher on what we were last discussing and where we left off.

In the previous two columns (see Resources ), we explored Java 3D. We discussed static content and small scenes, then used larger scene graphs and built interactivity into some basic 3D worlds.

Now that you know a little bit about using Java 3D, it's time to compare and contrast the Java 3D approach to 3D graphics with the leading graphics API contender: OpenGL.

3D computer graphics or three-dimensional computer graphics, (in contrast to 2D computer graphics ) are graphics that use a three-dimensional representation of geometric data (often Cartesian ) that is stored in the computer for the purposes of performing calculations and rendering 2D images . Such images may be stored for viewing later or displayed in real-time .

3D computer graphics rely on many of the same algorithms as 2D computer vector graphics in the wire-frame model and 2D computer raster graphics in the final rendered display. In computer graphics software, the distinction between 2D and 3D is occasionally blurred; 2D applications may use 3D techniques to achieve effects such as lighting , and 3D may use 2D rendering techniques.

3D computer graphics are often referred to as 3D models . Apart from the rendered graphic, the model is contained within the graphical data file. However, there are differences: a 3D model is the mathematical representation of any three-dimensional object. A model is not technically a graphic until it is displayed. A model can be displayed visually as a two-dimensional image through a process called 3D rendering or used in non-graphical computer simulations and calculations. With 3D printing , 3D models are similarly rendered into a 3D physical representation of the model, with limitations to how accurate the rendering can match the virtual model.

It has been a while since our last installment in this series on 3D graphics programming in Java (more on that at the end of this column). Here's a quick refresher on what we were last discussing and where we left off.

In the previous two columns (see Resources ), we explored Java 3D. We discussed static content and small scenes, then used larger scene graphs and built interactivity into some basic 3D worlds.

Now that you know a little bit about using Java 3D, it's time to compare and contrast the Java 3D approach to 3D graphics with the leading graphics API contender: OpenGL.

In order to build a true Java platform, Sun realized early on that it needed to fill out the API picture beyond the limited functionality available in the Java 1.0 core platform. Sun has grown the core a great deal with the 1.1 and impending 1.2 releases, but there are still some pieces missing from the Java puzzle.

Sun and its partners developed the Java Media and Communication APIs to provide the missing multimedia programming pieces. Two of the biggest pieces, 2D and 3D graphics, are targeted with the Java 2D and 3D APIs, respectively. Java 2D is a core platform API beginning with Java 1.2, while Java 3D will be released as an Extension API shortly after the 1.2 platform becomes available. We have recently finished a series of columns on Java 2D; now we turn our attention to Java 3D.

Java 3D is meant to give Java developers the ability to write applets and applications that provide three dimensional, interactive content to users. Sun has some heavy competition from other 3D graphics technologies in this arena, and Java 3D has an uphill battle ahead of it if it's to defeat the incumbent graphics standard, OpenGL.

Java 3D Programming steps programmers through the important design and implementation phases of developing a successful Java 3D application. The book provides invaluable guidance on whether to use Java 3D, user interface design, geometry creation, scene manipulation and final optimizations. The book does not attempt to exhaustively cover the API or replicate the official documentation but rather serves as a roadmap to alert programmers of design issues and potential pitfalls.

The author distills 12 months of using the Java 3D API for commercial projects, as well as innumerable discussions on the Java 3D email list into a book that all Java 3D developers will appreciate. Experienced Java 3D developers will applaud an authoritative resource containing the state-of-the-art in techniques and workarounds, while novice Java 3D programmers will gain a fast-track into Java 3D development, avoiding the confusion, frustration and time wasted learning Java 3D techniques and terminology.

Java 3D Programming comes complete with a comprehensive set of programming examples to illustrate the techniques, features, workarounds and bug fixes contained in the main text.

3D computer graphics or three-dimensional computer graphics, (in contrast to 2D computer graphics ) are graphics that use a three-dimensional representation of geometric data (often Cartesian ) that is stored in the computer for the purposes of performing calculations and rendering 2D images . Such images may be stored for viewing later or displayed in real-time .

3D computer graphics rely on many of the same algorithms as 2D computer vector graphics in the wire-frame model and 2D computer raster graphics in the final rendered display. In computer graphics software, the distinction between 2D and 3D is occasionally blurred; 2D applications may use 3D techniques to achieve effects such as lighting , and 3D may use 2D rendering techniques.

3D computer graphics are often referred to as 3D models . Apart from the rendered graphic, the model is contained within the graphical data file. However, there are differences: a 3D model is the mathematical representation of any three-dimensional object. A model is not technically a graphic until it is displayed. A model can be displayed visually as a two-dimensional image through a process called 3D rendering or used in non-graphical computer simulations and calculations. With 3D printing , 3D models are similarly rendered into a 3D physical representation of the model, with limitations to how accurate the rendering can match the virtual model.

3D computer graphics or three-dimensional computer graphics, (in contrast to 2D computer graphics ) are graphics that use a three-dimensional representation of geometric data (often Cartesian ) that is stored in the computer for the purposes of performing calculations and rendering 2D images . Such images may be stored for viewing later or displayed in real-time .

3D computer graphics rely on many of the same algorithms as 2D computer vector graphics in the wire-frame model and 2D computer raster graphics in the final rendered display. In computer graphics software, the distinction between 2D and 3D is occasionally blurred; 2D applications may use 3D techniques to achieve effects such as lighting , and 3D may use 2D rendering techniques.

3D computer graphics are often referred to as 3D models . Apart from the rendered graphic, the model is contained within the graphical data file. However, there are differences: a 3D model is the mathematical representation of any three-dimensional object. A model is not technically a graphic until it is displayed. A model can be displayed visually as a two-dimensional image through a process called 3D rendering or used in non-graphical computer simulations and calculations. With 3D printing , 3D models are similarly rendered into a 3D physical representation of the model, with limitations to how accurate the rendering can match the virtual model.

It has been a while since our last installment in this series on 3D graphics programming in Java (more on that at the end of this column). Here's a quick refresher on what we were last discussing and where we left off.

In the previous two columns (see Resources ), we explored Java 3D. We discussed static content and small scenes, then used larger scene graphs and built interactivity into some basic 3D worlds.

Now that you know a little bit about using Java 3D, it's time to compare and contrast the Java 3D approach to 3D graphics with the leading graphics API contender: OpenGL.

In order to build a true Java platform, Sun realized early on that it needed to fill out the API picture beyond the limited functionality available in the Java 1.0 core platform. Sun has grown the core a great deal with the 1.1 and impending 1.2 releases, but there are still some pieces missing from the Java puzzle.

Sun and its partners developed the Java Media and Communication APIs to provide the missing multimedia programming pieces. Two of the biggest pieces, 2D and 3D graphics, are targeted with the Java 2D and 3D APIs, respectively. Java 2D is a core platform API beginning with Java 1.2, while Java 3D will be released as an Extension API shortly after the 1.2 platform becomes available. We have recently finished a series of columns on Java 2D; now we turn our attention to Java 3D.

Java 3D is meant to give Java developers the ability to write applets and applications that provide three dimensional, interactive content to users. Sun has some heavy competition from other 3D graphics technologies in this arena, and Java 3D has an uphill battle ahead of it if it's to defeat the incumbent graphics standard, OpenGL.

 
 
 
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